Aug 20, 2018  
2018-2019 Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog

Academic Information and Regulations



Frequently Asked Questions

Students ask many of the following questions about the processes and rules of CSULB. Successful students know the answers to these frequently asked questions. Please read them carefully. Knowing these answers can help you avoid pitfalls during your first semesters on campus. For further information, contact the University Center for Undergraduate Advising at (562) 985-4837.

  1. Why is it critical that I check e-mail from CSULB? It is important to check your e-mail regularly since this is the primary means by which you will receive important information from the University (e.g., deadlines for adding and dropping classes, your enrollment appointment date).
  2. How do I tell the University about a change in my phone number, e-mail address or mailing address? You can use MyCSULB to change your phone number, e-mail address, indicate the e-mail address that you prefer to use, or change your mailing address. Click on "Personal Information" to view your current information and to make changes.
  3. Why should I check my official class schedule at the beginning of each semester and again after two or three weeks? It is important to make sure that you are officially enrolled in every class you are attending and not enrolled in any class you are not attending. Remember that an instructor can give you permission to add a class, but only you can officially enroll yourself in a class.
  4. Why is it important that I personally drop classes that I have registered for but am no longer attending? Instructors do not have the responsibility to drop students. Students must drop classes they no longer want or never attended (using MyCSULB) up to and during the first two (2) weeks of the semester.

    Beginning the third week, students must use the official withdrawal petition to change their schedule. (See the section on Withdrawals for the rules that apply to withdrawal after the third week of classes.)

    Official withdrawal is indicated on the transcript with the symbol "W." This designation does not affect grade point average (GPA). Undergraduates may withdraw from a career-maximum of 18 units per Executive Order 1037.

    Students who fail to withdraw officially within the established deadline receive a "WU" symbol (unauthorized withdrawal). In the calculation of the GPA, a "WU" is counted as an "F" grade.
  5. Can I enroll in a Fall class that requires a prerequisite if I am currently enrolled in the prerequisite course this Spring? Yes, your work in progress in the spring will be considered as meeting the prerequisite for registration purposes. However, if you fail the class in question, you will be dropped from the class that requires the prerequisite.
  6. Can freshmen/sophomore students take upper-division (300-499) classes? University policy prohibits students with under 30 units from taking upper-division courses without permission of the instructor.
  7. What can I do if I get a "D" or "F" or "WU" in a course? The University has a policy which allows undergraduates to repeat a course in which they earned a "D", "F," or "WU". If the second grade is a "C" or better and taken at CSULB, the second grade will be used to calculate your GPA. Both grades remain on the transcript, but the first one is "forgiven" from the GPA calculation. This can only be done once per course at CSULB. If you don't earn a "C" or better on the second try, all grades will be counted. Undergraduate students may repeat 28 units of which 16 can be for grade forgiveness, per Executive Order 1037. For further details, refer to the "Repetition of Courses for Credit" in this section of the Catalog.
  8. Can I use a first name other than my legal name? CSULB recognizes that, within our community, many students use names other than their legal names to identify themselves. As long as the use of this different first name is not for purposes of misrepresentation or to avoid legal obligations, the university acknowledges that a preferred first name can be used wherever possible as students engage in their education at CSULB. Therefore, the University allows for any current student to utilize a preferred first name whenever possible. To protect the University and to promote a positive campus community, requests will be reviewed for appropriateness. Preferred names cannot be nicknames, cannot contain foul or inappropriate language, nor can they be used for purposes of misrepresentation. The University reserves the right to approve or reject a request for the use of a preferred first name. Requests will be reviewed by Enrollment Services. Inappropriate use of the preferred first name guidelines--including, but not limited to, avoiding a legal obligation or misrepresentation--may be cause for denying the request. Inappropriate use of the preferred first name may result in a violation of the Standards for Student Conduct (CSULB Campus REGS, www.csulb.edu/regs) and may be referred to the Director of Student Conduct and Ethical Development.

Academic Calendar

California State University, Long Beach operates on a semester system, which is supplemented by a fee-supported summer term and a fee-supported winter session. Normally, fall semester classes begin in late August or early September. The last day of instruction usually comes midway in December; this allows for a week of final examinations prior to the winter recess, which begins about December 20. The spring semester usually begins in the last week of January and ends in mid-May, in time for a week of final examinations and the week of commencement exercises just before or after Memorial Day. The summer term begins in June through July and into late August.

Enrolling in Classes

Registration dates and detailed instructions can be found on the Enrollment Services website. Continuing students, returning undergraduates and newly admitted graduate students are sent a registration appointment date. Undergraduate students who are new to CSULB register when they attend the Student Orientation, Advising and Registration program (SOAR).

Students may enroll in classes via "MyCSULB" starting on the enrollment appointment day assigned by the University through the first two weeks of the fall and spring semesters. During the third week of the semester written permission on a Late Registration Request form is required from the instructor and a stamp of approval is required from the department. Late registration requests will be considered during the fourth week of instruction with the payment of a missed deadline fee.

Students receiving instructor or department "permission" to add classes via MyCSULB or who have been added to an instructor's wait list or roster must still complete the add procedures by the dates listed each semester. No request to add classes will be considered after the fourth week of the semester unless there is a verifiable technical error.

Students are not permitted to attend any class for which they have not officially registered.

Note: Students must complete the procedures for official enrollment in classes. Instructors, advisors and departments cannot add students into classes.

Registration Holds

Students may be prevented from registering because they have not met a University obligation. Students can view their own information (HOLDS) on MyCSULB.

Financial Holds

Students are personally responsible for making sure that registration fees and any other fees or charges are paid on time to CSULB, regardless of who funds the student's education.

These charges can include payment for items damaged, returned late, or not returned, and can include course fees for some courses or activities.

Students can review their account balance at MyCSULB. Payment can be made on MyCSULB or at the Cashier's Office, BH-148.

Students who have an unpaid balance will have a financial hold placed on their academic records until the balance is paid or a written release from the originating office is received by the Student Account Services Office. The hold restricts the student from receiving University services, including but not limited to registration, grades, and transcripts.

If the obligation continues to appear on the University reports, the student's name will be submitted to the Franchise Tax Board. In this case, the student or former student permanently loses the privilege of submitting checks as payment for fees or services. (Acceptable methods of payment are cash, cashiers' check or money order). The State then has the authority to withhold amounts owed to the University from any tax refund to which the student may be entitled.

Other Holds

The following types of holds may appear. Students should contact the office listed for information about how to clear the hold.

  • Failure to take a required test - Testing and Evaluation Services (562) 985-4006
  • Remediation hold - Pre-baccalaureate Advising and Support Services AS 14, (562) 985-7895
  • Perkins Loans - Business Office, BH 155, (562) 985- 5348
  • Measles/Rubella - Student Health Services, (562) 985- 4771
  • CIE hold (Foreign Clearance) - Center for International Education, BH 201, (562) 985-4106
  • No Major Hold - Enrollment Services, BH 101, (562) 985-5471
  • Timely Graduation Hold - Enrollment Services, BH 101, (562) 985-5471
  • Advising Hold - Advisor for Major
  • Title IX

Advising for Freshmen

CSULB is committed to offering our students the best possible first-year experience; therefore, we have established procedures which will ensure that all students receive accurate and timely academic advising. Advising is an opportunity for students to connect to their college or department advisor, faculty and staff to discuss future educational plans. Through this connection, students will be able to discuss future educational goals, review program options, and receive advice on course selection.

This connection is one of the most important steps to your future success at the Beach! We feel so strongly about ensuring that you have advising as you prepare for your sophomore year, that we require all freshmen to participate in the program prior to registering.

In addition, CSULB advisors can assist in a variety of different ways by working with students to broaden interests; develop academic and career goals; identify major areas of academic interest; create realistic plans of study; increase decision-making skills; take responsibility for academic direction.

All entering freshmen have "advising holds" placed on their records for their first year and will not be able to change their schedules without consultation with an advisor. Mid-way through the semester, freshmen will receive information about the Mandatory Advising Program, a comprehensive advising session to prepare for the next semester course selections. The advising hold will be removed after the student attends the advising session.

Class Attendance

Students are expected to attend classes regularly. Classroom attendance is often one of the most necessary and important means of learning and, in many classes, is essential to the educational objectives of the course.

Faculty members must include their guidelines for assigning grades in the syllabus. The syllabus must make clear whether any portion of the grade is based on attendance and/or participation. It is the students' responsibility to make themselves aware of each faculty member's guidelines by carefully reading the syllabus. (PS 04-05)

Faculty members may drop students who fail to attend class during the first week of the semester. However, students should not presume that they will be dropped by the faculty member. Students who have registered for a class, but never attended, should verify whether or not they are officially enrolled. It is the student's responsibility to withdraw officially from the class.

Students may have a valid reason to miss a class. When any of the following reasons directly conflict with class meeting times, students are responsible for informing faculty members of the reason for the absence and for arranging to make up missed assignments, tests, quizzes, and class work insofar as this is possible. Excused absences include, but are not limited to:

  1. Illness or injury to the student
  2. Death, injury, or serious illness of an immediate family member or the like
  3. Religious reasons (California Education Code section 89320)
  4. Jury duty or government obligation
  5. University sanctioned or approved activities (examples include: artistic performances, forensics presentations, participation in research conferences, intercollegiate athletic activities, student government, required class field trips, etc.)

Faculty members are not obligated to consider other absences as excused. Faculty members may require students to provide documentation for excused absences.

There are numerous classes offered on campus where attendance is crucial since student participation is essential. Absence from these courses may impact the work and participation of other students. Students who anticipate extended or multiple absences during a particular semester should consult with their advisor and the faculty member before enrolling in any class to determine whether it will be possible to complete the requirements for the course. Students who realize after enrollment that they will have extended or multiple absences should consult with the faculty member to see whether it will be possible to complete the course requirements.

The earliest possible notification is preferred. In some circumstances, it may be possible for the student to notify the faculty member of anticipated absences (e.g. for religious reasons or for scheduled athletic events) during the first week of enrollment. Advance notification (minimally one week in advance) is required for the following absences:

  1. Jury duty and other government obligation
  2. Religious reasons
  3. University sanctioned or approved activities

The California Education Code (section 89320) requires "each state university, in administering any test or examination, to permit any student who is eligible to undergo the test or examination to do so, without penalty, at a time when that activity would not violate the student's religious creed. This requirement shall not apply in the event that administering the test or examination at an alternate time would impose an undue hardship which could not reasonably have been avoided. In any court proceeding in which the existence of an undue hardship which could not reasonably have been avoided is an issue, the burden of proof shall be upon the institution."

It is the responsibility of the student to make advance notification, contact the faculty member to make arrangements to make up any academic work that may be missed, submit assignments on time, and to make arrangements regarding activities, tests, quizzes, or exams that may be scheduled during the absences.

If a student does not notify the faculty member one week in advance of the date of absences for these reasons (jury duty, governmental service, religious observances, or University sanctioned activities), the instructor is not required to adjust the class schedule or to allow for make up activities, tests, or exams. Students shall not, however, be penalized for excused absences when circumstances make it impossible to provide advance notice (e.g. student is engaged in a University sanctioned event such as a performance, tournament, or playoff which cannot be anticipated).

A student who expects to be absent from the University for any valid reason, and who has found it difficult to inform the instructor, should notify the academic department office. The department office shall notify the student's instructors of the nature and duration of the absence. It remains the responsibility of the student to arrange with instructors to make up any academic work missed.

In circumstances where an actual assignment, some specific class work, an activity, a quiz, or an exam cannot reasonably be made up, it is the instructor's option to assign alternative work. (PS 01-01)

Visitors to Classes

Only students registered for the class either as regular students or as auditors and invited guests of the instructor may attend classes at CSULB. Persons wishing to become guests of the instructor should seek the instructor's permission prior to the beginning of the class session.

Faculty Office Hours

The purpose of office hours is to provide opportunities for student-faculty interaction outside the classroom. Each instructional faculty member will hold one office hour per week for every class taught, up to a maximum of four hours. The faculty member's office hours, phone number, and email contact will be posted by the door and announced in the syllabus. (PS 02-10)

Cheating and Plagiarism

It is the policy of the faculty and administration to deal effectively with the student who practices cheating or plagiarism. These acts are fundamentally destructive of the process of education and the confident evaluation of a student's mastery over a subject. A University maintains respect and functions successfully within the larger community when its reputation is built on honesty. By the same token, each student benefits in helping to maintain the integrity of the University. This policy, therefore, provides for a variety of faculty actions including those which may lead to the assignment of a failing grade for a course and for administrative actions which may lead to dismissal from the University. This document is written with the intent to support the traditional values that students are on their honor to perform their academic duties in an ethical manner.

General

The following definitions of cheating and plagiarism shall apply to all work submitted by a student. Any change or refinement in the following definitions or applications of the definitions, necessitated by the nature of the work involved, shall be made by the faculty member or departments desiring the change. Any change shall be announced, in writing, in the relevant classes before the work is assigned and a copy of the changes will be filed in the department office and in the Office of Student Conduct and Ethical Development.

Definition of Plagiarism

Plagiarism is defined as the act of using the ideas or work of another person or persons as if they were one's own, without giving credit to the source. Such an act is not plagiarism if it is ascertained that the ideas were arrived at through independent reasoning or logic or where the thought or idea is common knowledge. Acknowledge of an original author or source must be made through appropriate references, i.e., quotation marks, footnotes, or commentary. Examples of plagiarism include, but are not limited to, the following: the submission of a work, either in part or in whole, completed by another; failure to give credit for ideas, statements, facts or conclusions which rightfully belong to another; in written work, failure to use quotation marks when quoting directly from another, whether it be a paragraph, a sentence, or even a part thereof; or close and lengthy paraphrasing of another's writing or programming. A student who is in doubt about the extent of acceptable paraphrasing should consult the instructor. Students are cautioned that, in conducting their research, they should prepare their notes by (a) either quoting material exactly (using quotation marks) at the time they take notes from a source; or (b) departing completely from the language used in the source, putting the material into their own words. In this way, when the material is used in the paper or project, the student can avoid plagiarism resulting from verbatim use of notes. Both quoted and paraphrased materials must be given proper citations.

Definition of Cheating

Cheating is defined as the act of obtaining or attempting to obtain or aiding another to obtain academic credit for work by the use of any dishonest, deceptive or fraudulent means. Examples of cheating during an examination would include, but not be limited to the following: copying, either in part or in whole, from another test or examination; discussion of answers or ideas relating to the answers on an examination or test unless such discussion is specifically authorized by the instructor; giving or receiving copies of an exam without the permission of the instructor; using or displaying notes; "cheat sheets," or other information or devices inappropriate to the prescribed test conditions, as when the test of competence includes a test of unassisted recall of information, skill, or procedure; allowing someone other than the officially enrolled student to represent the same. Also included are plagiarism as defined and altering or interfering with the grading procedures. It is often appropriate for students to study together or to work in teams on projects. However, such students should be careful to avoid use of unauthorized assistance, and to avoid any implication of cheating, by such means as sitting apart from one another in examinations, presenting the work in a manner which clearly indicates the effort of each individual, or such other method as is appropriate to the particular course.

Faculty Responsibilities in Allegations of Cheating or Plagiarism

Before a faculty member charges a student with cheating or plagiarism, the faculty member should have reasonable evidence with respect thereto. Reasonable evidence includes documentary or other physical evidence, personal observation, or testimony. Prior cheating or plagiarism is not reasonable evidence. In order to establish facts of the student's knowledge or skill, the faculty member may ask the student to provide such additional demonstration of competency as the faculty member deems necessary to evaluate scholarship and academic performance. The faculty member must advise the student that a decision to provide an opportunity for such an additional demonstration of competency is entirely at the faculty member's option and that the student may comply with the request of the faculty member at the student's option. Neither compliance nor noncompliance shall be considered an admission of cheating or plagiarism.

In cases where a student is suspected of cheating or plagiarism, the faculty member should arrange for an informal office conference with the student as soon as possible. The purpose of the informal conference is to bring the persons involved together to discuss the issues informally and to discuss courses of action. At the conference the student shall be notified by the faculty member of the charge and supporting evidence. For an incident which occurs during or as a part of a final examination consult the section just below.

In cases where there is more than one individual suspected of cheating or plagiarism, the faculty member may decide to call the students to confer jointly as a group, or as individuals, or both. If the faculty member should decide to confer with the students as a group, the students shall have the option to also confer with the instructor separately as individuals.

The faculty member shall inform the student(s) that both students and faculty have the right to submit a request to the Academic Integrity Committee (discussed below) for a written opinion on whether the accusation is supported by the evidence. All notes and discussions between the student and the faculty member are confidential, except as may be relevant to the Academic Integrity Committee or in subsequent campus disciplinary proceedings. Neither the faculty member nor the student should discuss a specific charge of cheating or plagiarism or any violations with reference to individuals in the classroom before other members of the class.

When the student cannot be contacted and therefore the informal conference cannot be held, as is sometimes the case after final examinations, a grade of "I" (Incomplete) may be assigned, but only if the instructor wishes an additional test of competence (see section just above). The instructor shall have the agreement form for assigning an "Incomplete" sent to the last known address of the student. The agreement form shall state the following:

Under the provisions of the CSULB Policy Statement on Cheating and Plagiarism, an additional test of competency related to the syllabus name of suspect demonstration (e.g., Final Examination) is requested. You may decline to do so. Please contact the instructor, the department office, or the Office of Student Conduct and Ethical Development for information regarding the University policy on Cheating and Plagiarism. The instructor must indicate on the agreement form the grade with will be assigned, normally 120 calendar days following mailing of the Incomplete Agreement, if the student does not respond or, responding, the student does not agree to an additional test of competence.

Charges of cheating or plagiarism cannot be brought against a student more than 120 calendar days after discovery that the work in question may have been plagiarized or that cheating may have taken place.

Notes and evidence shall be kept by the department chair or program director for a minimum of five years after the case is settled.

In implementation of the Executive Order from the Chancellor's Office that requires documentation of faculty action regarding cheating and plagiarism, the Academic Senate revised the Cheating and Plagiarism Policy to include the following language: After action has been taken by the faculty member, the faculty member shall complete a form that identifies the student who was found responsible, the general nature of the offense, the action taken, and a recommendation as to whether or not additional action should be considered by the Office of Student Conduct and Ethical Development. The complete form should be sent by the faculty member to both the provost and the vice president for student affairs whenever cases of academic dishonesty are handled by the faculty member.

Academic Integrity Committee

The Chair of the Academic Senate and the Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs shall jointly appoint an Academic Integrity Committee for the University. This Committee shall consist of one member from the student body, chosen by the Associated Students Government for a one year term of office; three members of the full-time, tenured or tenure-track faculty, each with a term of office of two years, terms of office expiring in alternate years; and one member of the Office of Academic Affairs, who shall be Chair, voting only in case of ties.

The primary charge of the Committee is to receive the requests of students accused of cheating or plagiarism or the requests of faculty accusing specified student(s) of cheating or plagiarism. Following its review of the evidence, the Committee shall report its opinion to the student(s) and to the faculty member involved on whether the accusation is supported by the evidence. This opinion may not be appealed. However, when new evidence appears to so warrant, a faculty member or student may ask, in writing, the Provost or the Chair of the Academic Senate to request the Committee to reconsider a case. The Academic Integrity Committee shall make readily available the rules and procedures governing its operations.

In all cases, a Report of the Committee is advisory to the student, with whom rests the presumption of innocence, and the faculty member, to whom the decision on the evidence and academic action is reserved.

A faculty member or student who requests a review of the evidence in a case of alleged cheating or plagiarism must make such a request to the Academic Integrity Committee in writing no later than 14 calendar days following the date of first notification of the student by the faculty member of the allegation. Except under extenuating circumstances, the student and faculty member will have no more than 14 additional calendar days to provide evidence to the Committee.

To preserve the rights of privacy, the Committee meetings shall be closed. The Committee may request additional information as may be appropriate to the development of its Reports. The Committee is to provide a final Report within 21 calendar days of the submission of a request to it. Should additional time be required, the reasons should be communicated to the Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and the Chair of the Academic Senate as well as the student(s) and faculty members involved.

The Committee is to report on its actions annually to the Vice President for Academic Affairs and the Chair of the Academic Senate.

Academic Action

One or more of the following academic actions are available to the faculty member who finds a student has been cheating or plagiarizing. These options may be taken by the faculty member to the extent that the faulty member considers the cheating or plagiarism to manifest the student's lack of scholarship or to reflect on the student's lack of academic performance in the course. These actions may be taken without a request for or before the receipt of a Report from the Academic Integrity Committee.

  1. Review - no action.
  2. An oral reprimand with emphasis on counseling toward prevention of further occurrences;
  3. A requirement that the work be repeated;
  4. Assignment of a score of zero (0) for the specific demonstration of competence, resulting in the proportional reduction of final course grade;
  5. Assignment of a failing final grade;
  6. Referral to the Office of Student Conduct and Ethical Development for possible probation, suspension, or expulsion.

Academic dishonesty cases that occur in the classroom shall be handled by faculty members. After a faculty member takes action, the faculty member shall complete a "Student Academic Dishonesty Report" form that identifies the student who was found responsible, the general nature of the offense, the action taken, and a recommendation as to whether or not additional action should be considered by the campus Office of Student Conduct and Ethical Development. The faculty member shall send a completed "Student Academic Dishonesty Report" form to the Vice President for Student Affairs and Provost whenever academic dishonestly cases are handled by the faculty member.

A student may appeal a final course grade the computation of which included an examination or other test of competence in which a score of zero was assigned for cheating or plagiarism, but only on the grounds permitted in the University Grade Appeal Policy Statement. An appeal of the final grade may include as written testimony the Report of the Academic Integrity Committee.

Disciplinary Sanctions - Administrative Action

Procedures and sanctions of the Office of Student Conduct and Ethical Development are under the administration of the Vice President for Student Services and are conducted pursuant to the authority provided in Section 41301 of Title 5 of the California Administrative Code. Copies of Section 41301 of Title 5 may be found in the University Bulletin and the Campus Regulations available in the Office of Judicial Affairs. Copies of Chancellor's Executive Order 148, "Student Disciplinary Procedures for the California State University" are also available upon request.

Opportunities for appeal regarding the sanctions applied by Vice President for Student Services are provided for students involved in the proceedings as outlined by Executive Order 148.

For a summary of the charges concerning cheating and plagiarism report to the Vice President for Student Services. (PS 08-02)

Student Unit Load

Recommended Student Load

The faculty recognizes that it is frequently necessary for students to hold part‑time jobs while attending the University. It advises that students enrolling under these conditions use good judgment in planning their programs. Students whose outside employment could be expected to interfere with the normal unit load should reduce their academic program accordingly.

The official unit limit per fall or spring semester is 18 units. Students seeking to exceed the 18-unit limit must complete an Extra Unit Petition form available on the Enrollment Services website.

Students are expected to spend, on the average, two hours of preparation and study for each hour of class time. Thus, a three-unit lecture or discussion course normally demands a commitment of nine hours per week averaged over the semester, with the class meeting for three hours a week. This may be considered sufficient time to enable a student to do satisfactory work. Students who desire to achieve "A" or "B" grades may wish to spend proportionately more time in their studies.

A student's employment and college time combined should not exceed 60 hours weekly. Students who make no allowances for their employment and outside obligations in planning their college programs will bear full responsibility for the resulting level of scholarship.

Minimum Unit Requirements for Students in Special Classifications

Veterans

In consideration of the Veterans Affairs Services requirement to equitably certify student veteran benefits in accordance with Title 38 of the United States Code, a post-baccalaureate student veteran in a credit-limited program is considered full-time as long as he or she is enrolled in those courses that are required by the educational program being pursued. Full-time status is awarded to all post-baccalaureate and graduate students who have less than nine (9) units when no other units are offered in their program. This status must be approved and coordinated with the Office of Veterans Affairs Services, located in the Foundation building, Suite 265. For information, call (562) 985-5115 or (562) 985-4279.

Graduate Students

For information about graduate student load, see regulations governing Master's Degrees in this Catalog.

International Students

Undergraduate international students on non‑immigrant visas must carry and complete a minimum of 12 units per semester unless a reduced load is authorized by the student's advisor and the Center for International Education. Reduced unit loads may be granted for substantial academic reasons or compelling personal reasons beyond the control of the student. Failure to secure such authorization results in violation of student status under U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services (USCIS) and State Department regulations, warranting discontinuance of enrollment.

Students with Disabilities

It is recommended that students with disabilities attempt to modify their schedules, as necessary, to lessen the impact of a disability. Students with disabilities may request to enroll in a unit load which is commensurate with their ability. Reduced unit load is defined as less than 12 units for undergraduates and less than 9 units for graduates. Such requests must be made to Disabled Student Services prior to each semester affected. If approved, the student will be entitled to all benefits, services, and activities governed by the University which are accorded to full-time students. Eligibility for benefits, services, and activities outside the University's control will be governed by each separate external agency based upon actual unit load.

Student Load Regulations

1.0 Maximum Student Load During The Fall And Spring Semesters

1.1 A student pursuing a baccalaureate degree or a credential program carrying 12 or more units during the fall or spring semester is classified as a full-time student. A student pursuing a post-baccalaureate certificate or master's degree carrying 8 or more units or a student pursuing a doctoral degree carrying 6 or more units during the fall or spring semester is also classified as a full-time student. These definitions derive from federal financial aid regulations and have no bearing on the definitions used by the State of California to determine a student's liability for the State University Fee.

1.2 The maximum number of units a student may take during the fall or spring semester is normally 18 for undergraduate, graduate, or post-baccalaureate students.

1.3 Exceptions to this limit will be made only on the basis of proven academic ability, the feasibility of a student's proposed schedule, and the evidence that it is necessary to enroll for an overload in order to complete the student's chosen academic program in a timely manner. Permission must be obtained from the office of the Division of Academic Affairs prior to registration.

2.0 Maximum Student Load During the Summer Term

2.1 The maximum number of units a student may take during the summer term is one unit per week, plus one additional unit. Thus, the maximum number of units is normally 7 for one 6-week session, 10 for two overlapping sessions, and 14 for an entire summer.

2.2 Exceptions to this limit will be made only on the basis of proven academic ability, the feasibility of a student's proposed schedule, and the evidence that the extra units will enable the student to graduate in that or the immediately subsequent term. Permission must be obtained from the office of the Division of Academic Affairs prior to registration.

3.0 Maximum Student Load During the Winter Session

3.1 The maximum number of units a student may take during the winter session is one unit per week, plus one additional unit. Thus, the maximum number of units is normally 4.

3.2 Exceptions to this limit will be made only on the basis of proven academic ability, the feasibility of a student's proposed schedule, and the evidence that the extra units will enable the student to graduate in that or the immediately subsequent term. Permission must be obtained prior to registration from the Associate Dean of the college of the student's major department.

Course Listings

Courses are listed in this Catalog by department, the departments and programs being arranged alphabetically. Each listing gives the course number, title, semester units in parentheses, and the course description, which includes prerequisites and other restrictions.

Course Numbers

Courses with a number of less than 100 do not count toward any degree program. For purposes of qualifying for financial aid, however, the unit value assigned to those courses will count for the semester in which those courses were taken. Lower-division courses are numbered from 100 through 299. These courses are designed primarily for Freshmen and Sophomores. They provide breadth of understanding and the foundation for the more specialized work in upper-division, advanced courses. Approved General Education courses are listed online and are offered at both the lower‑division and upper-division levels; no upper-division General Education course may be used in a graduate degree program. Lower-division courses are open to Junior, Senior, and Graduate students; however, lower-division courses may not be applied to any graduate degree program.

Upper-division courses are numbered from 300 through 499. These courses are open to students who have completed the prerequisites to the course, if any, stated in the course description and other departmental regulations given in this Catalog. A "Prerequisite" is a completed course or other measure of academic preparation which provides a foundation for the more advanced course.

Freshmen (fewer than 30 units) are not allowed to enroll in upper-division courses without permission of the instructor. Sophomores wishing to enroll in upper-division courses which indicate no prerequisites should consult with the course instructor or other knowledgeable advisor prior to enrollment. These courses are presented to meet the expectations of academically advanced students.

Certain 400‑level courses are double‑numbered with 500‑level courses. In these courses the expectations of graduate students, who must enroll in the 500‑level course, are greater than the expectations of undergraduates. Grading scales are different for the 500‑level course and additional work is required of graduate students. A student may not earn credit for both the 400‑ and 500‑level versions of a course.

Graduate‑level courses are numbered from 500 to 799. Courses numbered 500‑599 may be opened to senior students upon favorable petition. Courses numbered from 600 to 799 are open only to graduate students.

Included with some of the course numbers is a supplementary letter, or suffix, such as L for "laboratory" or A and B for a year‑long sequence. "A‑B" means that the courses must be taken in alphabetical sequence; "A,B" designates related courses which need not be taken in sequence. The student is given degree credit for each part of the sequence satisfactorily completed, whether or not the remaining part of the sequence is completed. Funding, student demand, and instructor availability may require that a course be offered in a different semester or session or be postponed until a later academic year. The online class schedule appropriate to the semester or session in question should be consulted for actual course scheduling information. Some of the courses offered during the fall and spring semesters are also offered during the summer session.

The University reserves the right to make changes in course offerings without notice.

Course Credit Units and Modes of Instruction

Course Credit Units

Each course has a specific credit unit value which is indicated in parentheses following the course titles in this Catalog.

In accordance with national standards, each semester unit corresponds to approximately 45 hours of work per semester, counting both class meeting time and outside preparation and study. For a traditional lecture or discussion course, this means that the class will meet one hour a week for every unit in a fall or spring semester (15 weeks of class meetings). For a laboratory or activity course, the class may meet two or three hours per week for every unit.

The instructional "hour" is fifty minutes long, allowing for transit between classes and rest breaks within multi‑hour classes.

Classes scheduled in the six-week summer session, or in a three-week summer or winter session, are scheduled for additional class hours per week so the total meeting time is the same as in a fall or spring semester. Classes taught by other modes of instruction are expected to require the same time commitment as traditionally-scheduled classes.

Hybrid Classes and Distance Education Classes

Some classes use academic technology to replace part or all of the face-to-face class meetings. In a hybrid class, one-third to two-thirds of the student/faculty and student/student contact time uses academic technology to structure remote activities. The remaining communication is face-to-face, similar to traditional classes. A Local Online Class is a course offering in which the majority of the instruction occurs when the student and instructor are not in the same place, but it may require up to two hours of face-to-face meetings per unit on the California State University, Long Beach campus within the given semester. A Distance Education Class is a course offering in which communication between faculty and student occurs primarily via academic technology, but it may also include off-site meetings. The mode of instruction is indicated in the online class schedule for each term. (PS 03-11)

Student Rights Relative to Course Instructional Mode

  1. Student access to the faculty shall not be reduced by the instructional mode of a class.
  2. The University shall make every effort to inform students of the mode of instruction and technological requirements of a course offering before the student enrolls in the class.
  3. Matriculated students enrolled in non-traditional classes shall have access to the on-site academic advising services at California State University, Long Beach.
  4. All students have equal access to the University library and other on-site learning resources offered at California State University, Long Beach.
  5. Students in non-traditional classes shall have reasonable support services. These include:
    1. Phone-based and online technology help to handle student questions and to refer students to appropriate available services for hybrid and local online or distance education courses;
    2. Online and phone-based access to university administrative services;
    3. Online dissemination of information describing the resources available for obtaining the technical competence needed to succeed in a specific course offering;
    4. Online access to the library research databases and other research-related resources.
  6. The University shall provide adequate technical support for academic technology.

Credit for Independent Study Courses

Each student enrolled in a supervised independent study, research, or reading course (excludes thesis courses) must have an agreement on file in the department office where the course is offered. The agreement is to be made between the student and the instructor at the beginning of the course and must include the following: a description of the work to be accomplished, specific information on the tasks required, the nature of the final report, and the basis for determining the final grade. The agreement must be signed by both the instructor and the student.

If a department wishes to use a written agreement different from the standard university form, it must be approved by the dean of the appropriate college prior to its use.

No independent study credit shall be awarded for classroom instruction, assisting in classroom instruction, or for other instructionally related activities, such as grading.

Credit for Cross‑Listed Courses

Certain courses are listed in this Catalog under more than one department. For purposes of awarding credit, all such listings are considered to be the same course, and a student may receive credit for only one of the listings. Normally, students will receive credit for such a cross‑listed course in the department under which they registered.

Transfer Credit

Students who were in good standing at another accredited institution may, within maximums, transfer credit for baccalaureate or graduate degree course work. Course equivalency for major requirements must be determined. Students are cautioned that the University is under no obligation to accept transferred courses for subject credit in addition to unit credit for admission. Normally, however, there is a probability that courses in the accepted core of a discipline will be exchangeable between universities. Policy regarding transfer of courses from California community colleges differs in some respects.

Transfer of Undergraduate Credit From Accredited Community Colleges

A maximum of 70 semester units earned in a community college may be applied toward the baccalaureate degree, with the following limitations and stipulations:

  1. No upper-division credit may be allowed for courses taken in a community college;
  2. Individual program regulations may include specific transfer limitations along with other requirements.
  3. Students who transfer general education certification are still required to complete at least 9 units of upper-division courses at the campus conferring the degree.
  4. Any course taken at community colleges can substitute for general education breadth requirements and lower-division requirements, if the course is approved as equivalent to the appropriate CSULB course. Students with more than 70 transferable units from community colleges will get subject matter credit for all such courses, but no more than 70 units will count toward degree units.
  5. All transferable units taken at community colleges will count toward computation of the overall grade-point average. All transferable units in the major taken at community colleges will count toward computation of the overall major grade-point average.

Courses Taken by Non-Matriculated Students in Any Term

No more than 24 units total taken during any term while in non-matriculated status may be used to fulfill any undergraduate degree requirements. All students who have not been formally admitted to CSULB and who take courses here are non-matriculated students. Courses taken by incoming freshmen during the summer prior to their first fall are considered non-matriculated units. Students looking to transfer units to a graduate program may take up to 9 units.

Open University

Open University - Through Open University, students who are NOT matriculated in CSULB may take regular university classes during spring or fall semesters for academic credit on a "space available" basis with permission of the department chair and the course instructor. Open University enrollment does NOT constitute admission to CSULB. For more information call the College of Continuing and Professional Education at (562) 985-5561.

Self Support Courses

There is no limit on CCPE Self Support course credits, including Winter, May and Summer Session, applicable to the degree if taken while in matriculated status in the degree program.

Baccalaureate Credit Based on Alternative Means of Assessment

The University grants credit toward the baccalaureate degree based on several types of assessment other than formal university courses. Students should consult the Chair or undergraduate advisor of the department about applicability to individual courses or degree requirements.

Advanced Placement Credit

Note: This table was updated on April 30th, 2018.

California State University, Long Beach grants credit toward its undergraduate degrees for successful completion of Advanced Placement (AP) examinations of the College Board. Students who present official scores directly from College Board of three or better will be granted up to six semester units (nine quarter units) of college credit for each AP course. Refer to the Advanced Placement Examination Credit table that follows for transfer credit awarded.

*Credit is awarded based on when the exam was taken. If your exams were taken in prior years, please review the CSULB catalog for the specific year to see how credit will be awarded.

Advanced Placement Examinations Credit

AP Exam

AP Score

GE Designation

Credit

Art History

3

4-5

C.1 Fine Arts

C.1 Fine Arts

ART - 6 units electives

AH 111A - 3 units & AH 111B - 3 units

Art Studio:
2D Design

3D Design

Drawing Portfolio

3-5

3-5

3-5

No GE Credit

No GE Credit

No GE Credit

ART - 3 units electives

ART - 3 units electives

ART - 6 units electives

Biology

3

4

5

B.1a Life Science w/lab

B.1a Life Science w/lab

B.1a Life Science w/lab

BIOL 200 - 4 units & 2 units BIOL electives

BIOL 200 - 4 units & 2 units BIOL elective

BIOL 211 - 3 units & BIOL 212 3 units

Chemistry

3

4-5

B.1b Physical Science w/lab

B.1b Physical Science w/lab

CHEM 100 - 4 units & 2 units CHEM electives

CHEM 111A - 5 units & 1 unit CHEM elective

Chinese Language and Culture

3

4-5

C.2c Foreign Language

C.2c Foreign Language

CHIN 201 - 4 units, & 2 units CHIN electives

CHIN 202 - 4 units & CHIN 490 - 2 units

Computer Science A

3-5

No GE credit

CECS 174 - 3 units

Computer Science Principles

3-5

B.2.

3 units elective

Economics:
Macro

Micro

3-5

3-5

D.2 Social & Behavioral Science

D.2 Social & Behavioral Science

ECON 100 - 3 units

ECON 101 - 3 units

English:
Language & Composition

Literature & Composition

3-5

3-5

A.1

A.1 & C.2a

ENGL 100 - 3 units & 3 units ENGL electives

ENGL 100 - 3 units & ENGL 180 - 3 units

Environmental Science

3,4,5

B.1b Physical Science w/lab

4 units elective

French:
Language and Culture

3

4,5

C.2c Foreign Language

C.2c Foreign Language

FREN 201A - 4 units & FREN 100B - 2 units

FREN 201B, 4 units & FREN 201A - 2 units

German:
Language and Culture

3

4-5

C.2c Foreign Language

C.2c Foreign Language

GERM 398 - 3 units & 3 units GERM electives

GERM 398 - 3 units, & GERM 498 - 3 units

Geography:
Human Geography

3-5

D.2

GEOG 160 - 3 units & 3 units GEOG electives

History:
United States

European

World History

3-5

3-5

3-5

D.1a (HIST 172) & D.2 (HIST 173)

D.2 (HIST 131) & D.2 (HIST 132) Global

D.2 Global

HIST 172 - 3 units & HIST 173 - 3 units

HIST 131 - 3 units & HIST 132 - 3 units

HIST 111 - 3 units & 3 units HIST 112 

Italian:
Language and Culture

3

4-5

C.2c Foreign Language

C.2c Foreign Language

ITAL 201A - 4 units & 2 units ITAL electives

ITAL 201B - 4 units & 2 units ITAL electives

Japanese Language and Culture

3

4

5

C.2c Foreign Language

C.2c Foreign Language

C.2c Foreign Language

JAPN 102 - 4 units, & JAPN 101 - 2 units

JAPN 201 - 4 units, & JAPN 102 - 2 units

JAPN 202 - 4 units, & JAPN 201 - 2 units

Latin

3

4-5

C.2c Foreign Language

C.2c Foreign Language

LAT 101B - 2 units & LAT 301 - 2 units & LAT 401 2 units

LAT 301 - 3 units & LAT 401 - 3 units

Mathematics:
Calculus AB**

Calculus BC

3-5

3-5

B.2

B.2

MATH 113 - 2 units & MATH 122 - 4 units

MATH 122 - 2 units & MATH 123 - 4 units

Music: Theory

3

4-5

No GE credit

MUS 140 - 2 units & 4 units MUS elective

MUS 141A - 2 units & MUS 142A - 3 units & 1 unit MUS elective

Physics:

Physics 1***

Physics 2***

Physics C (Mechanics) ***

Physics C (Electricity & Magnetism) ***

3-5

3-5

3-5

3-5

B.1b Physical Science w/lab

B.1b Physical Science w/lab

B.1b Physical Science w/lab

B.1b Physical Science w/lab

PHYS 100A - 4 units

PHYS 100B - 4 units

PHYS 151 - 4 units

PHYS 152 - 4 units

Political Science:
United States Government & Politics (1 semester)

Comparative Government & Politics (1 semester)

3-5

3-5

D.1b (Must take POSC 199 or POSC 326)

D.2 Global

POSC 100 - 3 units (does not include California State and local government)

POSC 215 - 3 units

Psychology (1 semester)

3-5

D.2

PSY 100 - 3 units

Seminar

3-5

No GE credit

3 units general electives

Spanish:
Language and Culture

 

Literature and Culture

3, 4

5

3

4, 5

C.2c Foreign Language

C.2c Foreign Language

C.2c Foreign Language

C.2c Foreign Language

SPAN 101B - 2 units & SPAN 201A - 4 units

SPAN 201A - 2 units & SPAN 201B - 4 units

SPAN electives - 6 units

SPAN 310 - 3 units & 3 units SPAN electives

Statistics (1 semester)

3

4, 5

B.2

B.2

STAT 108 - 3 units

STAT 118 -3 units

Notes for Advanced placement:

** Credit is awarded for a 3-5 on the AB exam score or the AB subscore on the BC exam.

*** If a student passes more than one AP exam in calculus, computer science, or physics, only six units of credit may be applied to the baccalaureate, and only four units of credit may be applied to a certification in GE Breadth.

A maximum of 6 units will be granted for each exam. If the number of units per course equivalency exceeds 6, credit for 6 units will be awarded and the course waived. Credit can only be awarded once per course. Example: if a student takes Calculus AB & BC, only nine units can be awarded.

International Baccalaureate Credit

Note: The IB Test Credit information shown below is for 2017-2018. The information for test credits for 2018-2019 will be updated on April 16, 2018.

Students with scores of 5 or higher (4 in certain subjects) in International Baccalaureate Higher Level courses will be awarded baccalaureate credit of 4 to 10 units, depending on course equivalency. Applicants to CSULB who wish to obtain lower-division course credit for completed International Baccalaureate Higher Level examinations must submit an official IB transcript. Course equivalency for Higher Level examinations completed with satisfactory scores is listed in the International Baccalaureate Examination Credit table that follows.

*Credit is awarded based on when the exam was taken. If your exams were taken in prior years, please review the CSULB catalog for the specific year to see how credit will be awarded.

International Baccalaureate Higher Level Examinations Credit
IB Exam IB Score Credit

Arts, Visual

Arts, Visual Option A

5, 6, or 7

5, 6, or 7

ART electives - 4 units

ART electives - 4 units

Arabic A: Literature

Arabic A: Language and Literature

Arabic B

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

ARAB 101A  - 4 units & 4 units ARAB 101B 

ARAB 201A  - 4 units & 2 units ARAB electives

ARAB 201B  - 4 units & 2 units ARAB electives

Biology

5

6

7

BIOL 200  - 4 units & 2 units BIOL electives

BIOL 200  - 4 units & 2 units BIOL electives

BIOL 211  - 3 units & BIOL 212  - 3 units

Business & Management 5, 6, or 7 CBA electives - 4 units
Chemistry 5, 6, or 7

CHEM 111A  - 5 units & 1 unit CHEM elective

Chinese A: Literature

Chinese A: Language and Literature

Chinese B

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

3 units GE C.2c & 3 units CHIN electives

3 units GE C.2c & 3 units CHIN electives

CHIN electives - 6 units

Classical Greek

4, 5, 6, or 7

GK 101A  - 4 units & GK 101B  - 4 units

Computer Science 5, 6, or 7 CECS electives - 4 units
Dance 5, 6, or 7 DANC electives - 4 units
Design Technology 5, 6, or 7 DESN electives - 4 units
Economics 5, 6, or 7 ECON 100  - 3 units & ECON 101  - 3 Units

English A: Literature

English A: Language and Literature

English B

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

ENGL 100  - 3 units & ENGL 180  - 3 units

ENGL 100  - 3 units & ENGL 180  - 3 units

ENGL 100  - 3 units & ENGL 180  - 3 units

Film in English 5, 6, or 7 ENGL electives - 4 units

French A: Literature

French A: Language and Literature

French B

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

FREN 312A  - 3 units & FREN 312B  - 3 units & FREN 411  - 3 units

FREN 312A  - 3 units & FREN 312B  - 3 units & FREN 411  - 3 units

FREN 312A  - 3 units & FREN 312B  - 3 units & FREN 314  - 3 units

Geography 5, 6, or 7 GEOG 100  - 3 units & 3 units GEOG elective

German A: Literature

German A: Language and Literature

German B

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

GERM 398  - 3 units & GERM 498  - 3 units

GERM 398  - 3 units & GERM 498  - 3 units

GERM 201A  - 4 units & GERM 201B  - 4 units

Hindi A: Literature

Hindi B: Language and Literature

Hindi B

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

3 units GE C.2c & 3 units elective

3 units GE C.2c & 3 units elective

6 units elective

History of Africa 5, 6, or 7 3 units GE D2 & 3 units HIST electives
History of the Americas 5, 6, or 7 3 units GE D2 & 3 units HIST electives

History of Asia
East & Southeast Asia & Oceania

South Asia and the Middle East

5, 6, or 7

5, 6, or 7

3 units GE D2 & 3 units HIST electives

3 units GE D2 & 3 units HIST electives

History of Europe 5, 6, or 7 HIST 132  - 3 units & 3 units HIST electives
History of Europe and the Middle East 5, 6, or 7 HIST 132  - 3 units & 3 units HIST electives
History and Culture Islamic Wotrld 5, 6, or 7 3 units GE D2 & 3 units HIST electives
Information Technology in a Global Society 5, 6, or 7 4 units of electives

Italian A: Literature

Italian A: Language and Literature

Italian B

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

3 units GE C.2c & 3 units ITAL electives

ITAL 312A  - 3 units & ITAL 312B  - 3 units & ITAL 411 - 3 units

ITAL 312A  - 3 units & ITAL 312B  - 3 units & ITAL 314 - 3 units

Japanese A: Literature

Japanese A: Language and Literature

Japanese B

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

JAPN 371  - 3 units & JAPN 421  - 3 units & JAPN 471  - 3 units

JAPN 371  - 3 units & JAPN 421  - 3 units & JAPN 471  - 3 units

JAPN 201  - 4 units & JAPN 202  - 4 units

Korean A: Literature

Korean A: Language and Literature

Korean B

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

KOR 102  - 4 units & 2 units KOR electives

KOR 102 - 4 units & 2 units KOR electives

KOR 102  - 4 units & 2 units KOR electives

Latin 4, 5, 6, or 7 LAT 301  - 4 units & 2 units of upper division Latin electives
Math - Higher Level 4, 5, 6, or 7 MATH 122   - 4 units
Further Mathematics - Higher Level 4, 5, 6, or 7 4 units of lower division Math electives
Music 5, 6, or 7 MUS 160  - 3 units & MUS 490  - 3 units
Philosophy 5, 6, or 7 PHIL 100  - 3 units & 1 unit PHIL elective
Physics 5, 6, or 7 PHYS 100A  - 4 units & PHYS 100B  - 4 units

Portuguese A: Literature

Portuguese A: Language and Literature

Portuguese B

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

PORT 100  - 6 units

PORT 200  - 6 units

PORT 201B - 4 units & 2 units PORT electives

Psychology 5, 6, or 7 PSY 100  - 3 units & 1 unit PSY elective

Russian A: Literature

Russian A: Language and Literature

Russian B

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

3 units GE C.2c & 3 units RUSS electives

RUSS 312  - 3 units & RUSS 314  - 3 units & 3 units upper division RUSS electives

RUSS 201A - 4 units & RUSS 201B - 4 units

Social and Cultural Anthropology 5, 6, or 7 4 units ANTH electives

Spanish A: Literature

Spanish A: Language and Literature

Spanish B

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

3 units GE C.2c, & 3 units SPAN electives

SPAN 300  - 6 units & SPAN 314  - 3 units

SPAN 300  - 6 units

Swedish A: Literature

Swedish A: Language and Literature

Swedish B

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

3 units GE C.2c & 3 units elective

3 units GE C.2c & 3 units elective

6 units electives

Theatre Arts 4, 5, 6, or 7 THEA 122   - 3 units & 3 units THEA Electives

Vietnamese A: Literature

Vietnamese B: Language and Literature

Vietnamese B

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

4, 5, 6, or 7

3 units GE C.2c & 3 units electives

3 units GE C.2c & 3 units electives

6 units electives

**For languages not offered at CSULB: Students who receive a score of 4, 5, 6, or 7 on the Language B portion will be granted 3 units of GE Category C2c credit.

Credit for Other External Examinations

Note: The CLEP Test Credit information shown below is for 2017-2018. The information for test credits for 2018-2019 will be updated on April 16, 2018.  

In addition to the Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Examinations, California State University, Long Beach grants unit credit to those students who pass the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) examinations in certain subjects that have been approved for credit by the CSU System. Scores must be submitted directly from CollegeBoard.

Refer to the College Level Examination Program Credit table that follows, for transfer credit awarded.*

*Credit is awarded based on when the exam was taken. If your exams were taken in prior years, please review the CSULB catalog for the specific year to see how credit will be awarded.

College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) Credit
CLEP Exam CLEP Score Credit
Accounting, Principles of 50 3 units of elective credit
American Literature 50 3 units GE C2a Literature
Analyzing & Interpreting Literature 50 3 units of GE C2a Literature
Biology 50 BIOL 200  - 4 units
Business Law, Intro 50 3 units BLAW elective credit
Chemistry 50 3 units GE B1bNL Physical Sciences without Laboratory

Economics:
Macro

Micro

50

50

ECON 100  - 3 units

ECON 101  - 3 units

Educational Psychology, Introduction to 50 3 units elective credit
English Literature 50 3 units GE C2a Literature
Financial Accounting 50 3 units elective credit

French:
Language, Level 1

Language, Level 2

50-62

63-100 

FREN 101B  - 4 units & 2 units FREN elective

FREN 201A  - 4 units & FREN 201B  - 4 units & 4 units FREN electives

German:
Language, Level 1

Language, Level 2

50-62

63-100

GERM 101B  - 4 units & 2 units GERM electives

GERM 201A  - 4 units & GERM 201B  - 4 units & 4 units GERM electives

History, United States I 50 3 units GE D1a U.S. History
History, United States II 50 3 units GE D1a U.S. History
Human Growth and Development 50 3 units GE area E Lifelong Learning and Self-Development
Humanities 50 3 units GE C3 Other Humanities
Information Systems & Computer Applications 50 3 units elective credit
Management, Principles 50 3 units elective credit
Marketing, Principles of 50 3 units elective credit
Mathematics:
College Mathematics

College Algebra

Precalculus

Calculus

50

50

50

50

MATH 103  - 3 units

MATH 113  - 3 units

MATH 113  - 3 units

MATH 122  - 4 units

Natural Sciences 50 3 units of GE B1aNL Life Science without Laboratory OR 3 units of GE B1bNL Physical Science without Laboratory

Political Science:
American Government

50

POSC 100  - 3 units (does not include California State and local government)

Psychology, Introductory 50 PSY 100  - 3 units
Sociology, Introductory 50 SOC 100  - 3 units

Spanish:
Language, Level I

Language, Level 2

50-62

63-100

SPAN 101B  - 4 units & 2 units SPAN electives

SPAN 201A  - 4 units & SPAN 201B  - 4 units & 4 units SPAN electives

Western Civilization I 50 3 units GE D2 Social Sciences and Citizenship
Western Civilization II 50 3 units GE D2 Social Sciences and Citizenship

Unit Credit by Examination

Students may also challenge some courses by taking examinations developed at the campus. Credit will be awarded to those who pass them successfully. Credits earned in this manner will be recorded as test credit on the student's transcript and will be counted toward the total number of units required for the degree although they will not be included in calculation of the grade‑point average. Credit by examination may not be used to fulfill the minimum residence requirement.

Students must be enrolled in the University and in the course for which they wish to receive credit by examination. Enrollment is by permission of the department and is only available during the academic semester in which the course is being offered. Students must secure a signed and dated approval form from the department PRIOR to enrolling in the course. Students must provide the instructor with a copy of the signed and dated approval form at the first class meeting. The instructor will ensure that the examination is conducted, scored, and the results reported prior to the end of the third week of classes. Students who pass the examination will receive academic credit for the course work. Students who do not pass the examination have two options:

  1. continue in the course as a regular student; or
  2. withdraw from the course.

The University sets no maximum on the number of credits a student may receive by examination. Not all courses, however, are available for credit by examination. Information about courses for which credit by examination is not permitted is available in the Department Office, in the College Office, and the Office of Enrollment Services. A student may NOT receive credit by examination:

  1. for an activity course,
  2. for any course which is a prerequisite to one for which credit has been received, (see department for possibility of course waiver),
  3. to remove a grade of "F," "WU," "NC,"
  4. to satisfy the courses required for a major in a master's degree.  
  5. for any course in which the content or methodology is such that an examination does not appropriately measure competence.

Application forms to apply for credit by examination are available in department offices and in the Office of Enrollment Services. Procedures and criteria for requesting unit credit by examination in a given course are available in the appropriate department office. (PS 87-04)

Substitution of Courses

Students who believe that a course they have taken (or intend to take) may be appropriate to their program and that this course could substitute for a specified course requirement may request that the department submit an official authorization for substitution. Course substitutions are normally limited to cases where the required course cannot be offered or where the student has taken a similar but not identical course elsewhere. (PS 87-04)

Waiver of Course Requirement

In addition, students who believe that previous training has sufficiently prepared them in a certain area may request a waiver of a specific course requirement (subject credit only). The student will be required to justify the request in a way acceptable to the department. A waiver of specific course requirements does not reduce the total number of credits required for the major or the degree. (PS 87-04)

International Program Credit

Course credits earned in universities abroad may be accepted for degree credit at CSULB subject to evaluation by the cognizant department or program upon admission of the student to the university.

The Center for International Education administers many international education and exchange programs. Students fully accepted into one of these programs may, in most cases, continue CSULB residency while studying in the approved foreign institution. Some courses taken through these programs do not have to be approved in advance.

Credit for Noncollegiate Instruction

The California State University, Long Beach grants undergraduate degree credit for successful completion of noncollegiate instruction, either military or civilian, appropriate to the baccalaureate degree, that has been recommended by the Commission on Educational Credit and Credentials of the American Council on Education. The number of units allowed are those recommended in the Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experience in the Armed Services and the National Guide to Educational Credit for Training Programs. Official transcripts are required.

CSULB maintains a written record of previous education and training of Servicemembers, Veterans, and other students certified for veterans' education benefits which clearly indicates that appropriate credit has been given by the school for previous education and training, with the training period shortened proportionately. The record is cumulative in that the results of each enrollment period is included so that it shows each subject undertaken and the final result, i.e., passed, failed, incomplete or withdrawn. 

Final Course Grades, Grading Procedures, and Final Assessments

  1. Part One: Definitions The following definitions apply to final course grades assigned in all undergraduate and graduate courses:
    "A" - Performance of the student has been at the highest level, showing sustained excellence in meeting all course requirements and exhibiting an unusual degree of intellectual initiative.
    "B" - Performance of the student has been at a high level, showing consistent and effective achievement in meeting course requirements.
    "C" - Performance of the student has been at an adequate level, meeting the basic requirements of the course.
    "D" - Performance of the student has been less than adequate, meeting only the minimum course requirements.
    "F" - Performance of the student has been such that minimal course requirements have not been met.
    "CR/NC" - In some courses, the university permits students to select evaluation on a "Credit" or "No Credit" basis.

These grades are defined as follows: "CR" is usually equivalent to an "A," "B," or "C;" and "NC" is equivalent to a "D," "F," or "WU" (defined below).

In two circumstances a final course grade of "CR" reflects work at the level of "B" or better, and a final course grade of "NC" reflects work at the level of "C," "D," "F," or "WU." Those two circumstances are:

  1. In certain professional preparation courses, providing that the students are notified of such a policy both in class materials and in the catalog course description;
    and
  2. For graduate students in all courses at the 300, 400, 500, and 600 levels.

Special regulations and procedures governing the "CR/NC" grading system are described below in Part Two. The following definitions apply to administrative grading symbols assigned in all undergraduate and graduate courses:

"AU" - "Audit." Enrollment as an auditor is subject to permission of the instructor, provided that enrollment in a course as an auditor shall be permitted only after students otherwise eligible to enroll on a credit basis have had an opportunity to do so. Auditors are subject to the same fee structure as credit students and regular class attendance is expected. It is the responsibility of the student to request from the instructor what is meant by regular class attendance. The symbol "AU" is posted to the student's permanent academic record unless the student fails to attend a sufficient number of class meetings. In these cases, the instructor will request that the student be administratively withdrawn from the course. Once enrolled as an auditor, a student may not change to credit status unless such a change is requested prior to the last day to add classes. A student who is enrolled for credit may not change to "Audit" after the last day to add classes.

"I" - "Incomplete." The symbol "I" indicates that a portion of required course work (normally not more than one-third) has not been completed and evaluated in the prescribed time period due to unforeseen, but fully justified, reasons and that there is still a possibility of earning credit. No instructor may assign an Incomplete if the student must attend a major portion of the class when it is next offered. No student may re-enroll in any course in which he/she has received an "I" until that "I" has been converted to a grade other than "I," i. e., "A," "B," "C," "D," "F," "CR," or "NC." In such cases, the instructor must assign a grade of "A," "B," "C," "D," "F," "CR," or "NC" based on the available assessments of that student's performance. It is the responsibility of the student with an "I" to bring pertinent information to the attention of the instructor and to determine from the instructor the remaining course requirements that must be satisfied to remove the "Incomplete." A final course grade is assigned when that work has been completed and evaluated. An "I" must normally be made up within one calendar year immediately following the end of the term during which it was assigned. This limitation prevails whether or not the student maintains continuous enrollment. Failure to complete the assigned work will result in an "I" being converted to an "F," except as noted in item 3 below. An extension of time may be granted for contingencies such as military service or documented, serious health or personal problems.

The conditions for removal of the "Incomplete" shall be documented by the instructor on an Incomplete contract. This contract shall include a statement of:

  1. All work completed in the course, the grades assigned for that work, and the percentages of the final course grade accounted for by each item;
  2. The work not completed and the percentage that each uncompleted assignment will count toward the final course grade; and
  3. The final course grade the instructor will assign if the course requirements are not completed within one calendar year, or a shorter period as specified on the form, immediately following the term in which the "I" was assigned, without respect to continuous enrollment of the student during this period.

If clear percentages for assignments cannot be delineated, instructors shall explain any special conditions for determining final course grades for work wholly or partially made up.

The student must agree with the conditions of the contract within 30 days. If the student does not accept the conditions by the deadline, the Incomplete grade will lapse to an "F". When the work agree upon has been completed and evaluated, a final course grade will be assigned by the instructor. Please note for graduating seniors: no additional work may be completed after the degree is awarded. No additional plans (minors, majors, or certificates) can be added after a degree is conferred. No grade can be changed after the degree is awarded, except for a change resulting from a grade appeal. Any Incomplete remaining on the record as of the graduation date will be counted as if it were an "F" with units attempted but no grade points earned, unless the instructor has specified on the Incomplete contract that some other grade be recorded.

"RD" - "Grade Not Reported" This symbol is used exclusively by Enrollment Services to permit processing of all final course grades when the final course grades for an entire course section have not been reported by the instructor. The symbol does not imply any academic evaluation. Individual instructors may not assign "RD." Students who remain enrolled but for whom the instructor has no assessments must receive a "WU."

"RP" - "Report in Progress." The "RP" symbol is used in connection with courses requiring multiple enrollment (i.e., that extend beyond one academic term). It indicates that work is in progress but that assignment of a final course grade must await completion of additional work. Re-enrollment is permitted prior to assignment of a final course grade provided the cumulative units attempted do not exceed the total number applicable to the student's educational objective. Work is to be completed within one calendar year immediately following the end of the term during which it was assigned except for graduate degree theses. If the "RP" symbol is not replaced by a final course grade within the specified time period or prior to the student's declared graduation date, it will be changed to a "W" (unless the "RP" is assigned to an Early Start course, in which case it will remain on the student's transcript as an "RP"). An "RP" symbol cannot be replaced by an "I" (Incomplete) symbol; an "I" is not a final course grade.

"W" - "Withdrawal." The symbol "W" indicates that the student was permitted to drop a course after the second week of instruction with the approval of the instructor and appropriate campus official. It carries no connotation of quality of student performance and is not used in calculating grade point average.

Students are held responsible for completion of every course in which they register or for withdrawing during the first two weeks of a regular semester (13% of nonstandard session) of classes from courses that they do not intend to complete. Application for withdrawal from CSULB or from a class must be officially filed by the student with Enrollment Services whether the student has ever attended the class or not; otherwise, the student will receive a grade of "WU" (unauthorized withdrawal) in the course.

Regulations governing the refund of student fees in the California State University system are prescribed by the CSU Board of Trustees; see California Code of Regulations, Title 5, Education, Section 41802.

  1. Withdrawal during the first two weeks of instruction: Students may withdraw during this period and the course will not appear on their permanent records.
  2. Withdrawal after the second week of instruction and prior to the final three weeks of the regular semester (20% of a non-standard session) of instruction: Withdrawals during this period are permissible only for serious and compelling reasons. The approval signatures of the instructor and department chair are required. The request and approvals shall state the reasons for the withdrawal. Students should be aware that the definition of "serious and compelling reasons" as applied by faculty and administrators may become narrower as the semester progresses. Copies of such approvals are kept on file by Enrollment Services.
  3. Withdrawal during the final three weeks of instruction:
    Withdrawal during the final three weeks of instruction are not permitted except in cases such as accident or serious illness where the circumstances causing the withdrawal are clearly beyond the student's control and the assignment of an Incomplete is not practical. Ordinarily, withdrawal in this category will involve total withdrawal from the campus except that a Credit/No Credit grade or an Incomplete may be assigned for other courses in which sufficient work has been completed to permit an evaluation to be made. Request for permission to withdraw under these circumstances must be made in writing on forms available from Enrollment Services. The requests and approvals shall state the reasons for the withdrawal. These requests must be approved by the instructor of record, department chair (or designee), college dean (or designee), and the academic administrator appointed by the president to act in such matters. Copies of such approvals are kept on file by Enrollment Services.
  4. Limits on Withdrawal
    No undergraduate student may withdraw from more than a total of 18 units. This restriction extends throughout the entire undergraduate enrollment of a student at CSULB for a single graduation, including special sessions, enrollment by extension, and re-enrolling after separation from the university for any reason. The following exceptions apply:
    1. Withdrawals prior to the end of the second week of a semester (13%) of instruction at CSULB,
    2. Withdrawals in terms prior to fall 2009 at CSULB,
    3. Withdrawals at institutions other than CSULB, and
    4. Withdrawals at CSULB for exceptional circumstances such as serious illness or accident (the permanent academic record will show these as a WE to indicate the basis for withdrawal).
  5. Catastrophic Withdrawal:
    CSULB may allow a student to withdraw without academic penalty from classes if the following criteria are met:
    1. The Petition to Withdraw from Classes in the Final Three Weeks of Instruction and the appropriate Catastrophic Withdrawal Request (Medical or Beyond Student's Control) is submitted to Enrollment Services by the published deadlines,
      and
    2. The student presents evidence to demonstrate that a severe medical condition or other circumstances beyond the student's control prevented the student from attending and/or doing the required work of the courses to the extent that it was impossible to complete the courses.

Although students will normally withdraw from all courses under these circumstances, students with serious and compelling reasons may be allowed to withdraw from only some of their courses; such instances will require additional justification.

The academic administrator appointed by the president to act in such matters will review the evidence presented and, in consultation with appropriate medical or other professionals as needed, determine whether the request for a Catastrophic Withdrawal should be granted. Once granted, all such withdrawals will appear on the student's permanent record with a symbol of "WE" to indicate the basis for withdrawal and will not count toward the limit described in 4 above. In addition, the student may be required to obtain clearance from the appropriate medical or other professional that states the student is well enough to return to classes with the full expectation that the student will be able to complete the semester and intended educational objectives in a timely manner.

Repeat Catastrophic Withdrawal:

If the student has received a Catastrophic Withdrawal and makes a request for an additional Catastrophic Withdrawal, the University must consider the question of whether or not the student can complete appropriate educational objectives. If an additional Catastrophic Withdrawal is granted, the student may be required to obtain clearance from an appropriate medical or other professional that states the student is well enough to return to classes with the full expectation that the student will be able to complete the semester and intended educational objectives in a timely manner.

  1. Instructor Withdrawal:

An instructor may withdraw a student who has never attended a class, if done before the end of the second week of classes. Because instructors are not required to do this, students should not rely on them and should officially withdraw from classes themselves to avoid assignment of a "WU" in the course. An instructor may also withdraw a student during the first two weeks of classes who has enrolled in a course requiring "permission of the instructor", completion of prerequisites, or concurrent enrollment in corequisites if the student has not properly secured this permission, satisfactorily completed the prerequisites before enrolling, or enrolled in the required corequisites.

"WE" - "Withdrawal for Extenuating Circumstances." The symbol "WE" indicates the student withdrew for reasons, usually medical or psychological but not restricted to those, clearly beyond the student's control. Such cases will normally involve the withdrawal from all courses that semester. Withdrawals for extenuating circumstances will not count toward the limits on withdrawal. The symbol "WE" is not a grade and does not alter a student's grade point averages.

"WU" - "Unauthorized Withdrawal." The symbol "WU" indicates that an enrolled student did not complete course requirements but did not withdraw from the course. It is used when, in the opinion of the instructor, completed assignments or course activities or both were insufficient to make normal evaluation of academic performance possible (letter grades "A," "B," "C," "D," "F", or an "I"). Instructors of record must report the last known date of attendance for all students who receive a "WU." A student who receives a "WU" may not complete additional work and have the "WU" changed to a letter grade. In courses that are graded "Credit/No Credit" or in cases where the student has elected "Credit/ No Credit" evaluation, use of the symbol "WU" is inappropriate and "NC" must be used instead. For purposes of grade point averages a "WU" is equivalent to an "F."

  1. Part Two: Course Grading Option

The faculty determines in advance which courses may be taken for "A," "B," "C," "D," or "F" grade only, "CR/ NC" only, or either. When a course is designated for "CR/ NC" grading only or for "A," "B," "C," "D," or "F" grading only, mention of this fact shall be incorporated in the catalog course description. Any undergraduate course may be designated for or closed to the option of "CR/NC" grading whether or not the course is a requirement for an undergraduate degree major, minor, certificate, credential, or concentration.

No course in which a final course grade of "CR" has been assigned may be used to fulfill the requirements for a master's degree, except that the final course grade of "CR" may be permitted for master's theses or projects (to a maximum of six units) when the individual department has specifically designated "CR/NC" grading for the thesis/project course in the department, and for fieldwork, practicum, research, or internship courses (also to a maximum of six units). The option of "CR/NC" grading for graduate students in undergraduate courses is subject to specific regulations of the individual departments regarding their graduate students and regarding the authorization for this option intrinsic to the approved course. Otherwise, no limitation exists as to the number of courses taken by graduate students under this policy. An undergraduate student may elect "CR/NC" grading in no more than a total of 24 units, of which no more than twelve may be upper division units. No more than eight units per semester may be taken for "CR/NC" grades.

Exemptions from these limitations are:

  1. Courses graded "CR/NC" taken at another institution,
  2. Course credit earned by examination, and
  3. Courses in which "CR/NC" grading is the only form of grading.

The decision to elect the "CR/NC" grading option for a course must be made by the last day to add classes. To elect "CR/NC" grading, the student must obtain the signature of the student's major advisor and a stamp from the department/program in which the course is offered on the appropriate form. The student must then file the signed form with Enrollment Services. The decision to register for a course on a "CR/NC" basis remains in effect unless a change is requested prior to or on the last day to add classes.

The only exception to this rule is for students who declare new majors after the last day to add classes. If the newly declared major requires letter grading for the course in question and the student has elected "CR/NC" grading, then the student may request that "A," "B," "C," "D," or "F" grading be used. Such a change must be requested no later than the last day of instruction. The grading option may not be changed after the end of the semester.

  1. Part Three: Final Assessments
    1. Every course shall have a final assessment appropriate to the course that shall cover a significant proportion of the course.
    2. Every course except Distance Learning Courses shall meet and have an educational experience at the date and time listed in the Final Examination Schedule.
    3. All instructors shall administer the final assessment (e.g., an exam or presentation) or have it due (e.g., a paper or project) at a specified time that falls within the date and time listed in the Final Examination Schedule, as part or all of an educational experience.
    4. The college dean must approve any exception to these requirements.
  2. Part Four: Assignment of Final Course Grades
    1. The instructor of record in a course section (i.e., the faculty member officially assigned to teach that section) has the exclusive responsibility and authority to assign final course grades to all students in that section, subject only to the following exceptions:
      1. Should the instructor of record be unable or unwilling to complete this task because of death, disability, separation of employment, or prolonged absence from campus during a regular academic term, the department chair or program director, following notification of the instructor of record where appropriate and with the approval of the college dean, may appoint another instructor with the most appropriate qualifications in the discipline to complete the assignment of final course grades; or
      2. In the event of a successful grade appeal (detailed below in Part Five: Change of Final Course Grades).
    2. Final course grades shall be based on at least three, and preferably more, demonstrations of competence by the student. Exceptions require the college dean's approval.
    3. In no case shall the grade on any single demonstration of competence count for more than one-third of the final course grade. Exceptions require the college dean's approval. This provision does not abridge a faculty member's right to assign a course grade of "F" for a single act of cheating, plagiarism, fabrication or falsification of information, or other form of academic dishonesty.
    4. At the start of the course and in keeping with PS 11- 07 (Course Syllabi and Standard Course Outlines), instructors shall provide to their students in writing:
      1. The grading policies and practices to be employed in the class;
      2. The rules that will apply to withdrawals; and
      3. Any other rules governing attendance, class participation, in-class use of electronics, or other conduct-related policy that may affect a student's final grade in a course.
    5. Instructors shall keep a record of students' scores on each of the demonstrations of competence on which the final course grade is based.
    6. Instructors shall provide students with an opportunity for demonstration of competence, relevant to the determination of their final course grade in the course, as early as is reasonable and no later than the midpoint of the term.
    7. Students have a right to be informed promptly of their scores and to review each of their demonstrations of competence with their instructors.
    8. If materials submitted for a demonstration of competence are not returned, these materials must be retained for at least two subsequent semesters by the instructor. The materials shall be accessible to the department office. In the absence of the original instructor, an instructor with appropriate qualifications may be appointed by the chair to review the demonstration of competence with the student.
    9. Grades reported to Enrollment Services are considered to be official and final course grades.
  3. Part Five: Change of Final Course Grades

    1. Changes of final course grades or grading symbols can be made only on the basis of an error, a successful grade appeal (detailed in the separate policy statement on grade appeals), or resolution of an "Incomplete" ("I"). A final course grade or grading symbol shall not be changed on the basis of additional work submitted, except where an "I" was recorded.
    2. Original final course grades are replaced only when the change is due to an error, the grade change is the result of a grade appeal, or Enrollment Services receives a late report of final course grades for which the symbol "RD" was substituted pending receipt. Original final course grades or grading symbols are not replaced when the change of grade is the result of the resolution of an "Incomplete" or the repetition of a course. Final course grades or administrative grading symbols must be recorded for all enrollments beyond the census date.
    3. Except for changes of final course grades resulting from grade appeals, all changes of final course grades must be filed within one year from the date of the filing of the first final course grade, without respect to continuous enrollment of the student. Only as the result of a successful grade appeal or the correction of an error will a final course grade be changed after the award of a degree or credential or certificate.
    4. All requests for change of a final course grade shall carry the recommendation of the instructor (except as provided for in the grade appeals procedures) and the department chair and the approval of the college dean.

Student Grade Record

A record is kept and grade or administrative symbol notations are indicated for all enrollments beyond the second week of instruction.

Repetition of Courses

Most courses at CSULB may be completed only once for credit. Certain other courses (see below) may be repeated for additional unit credit. Within limits (see below), any course at CSULB may be repeated for grade forgiveness or grades averaged but without additional unit credit.

Repetition of Courses with Grade Forgiveness or Grades Averaged

Undergraduate students (students who have not yet earned a baccalaureate degree) may repeat, for the purpose of excluding the grade from grade point determination (i.e., grade forgiveness), courses taken at California State University, Long Beach in which a grade of D, F, or WU was received subject to the limits established below. Undergraduate students may repeat courses in which a grade of NC was received for grades averaged only subject to the limits established below. Students pursuing second baccalaureates, credentials, certificates, or master's or doctoral degrees may not repeat courses for grade forgiveness, although they may repeat courses for grades averaged without limits.

Courses Taken First at CSULB

Eligible students may repeat a course once for the purpose of grade forgiveness if the course was repeated only at CSULB. The adjustment is automatically calculated at the end of the semester in which the course was repeated. Although the first grade will remain on the student's permanent record, only the grade and grade points of the repeated course on the second attempt will count toward the grade point averages and units earned, provided the second grade was A, B, C, or CR. If the second grade was D, F, or WU, then both grades will count toward the relevant grade point averages (i.e., grades averaged), and the attempt will count toward the limits for grades averaged detailed below. Students with extenuating circumstances may file a Petition for Exception to Academic Policy with Enrollment Services to repeat a course more than once if they fail to achieve an A, B,C, or CR. In such cases, the additional repeat will not result in the forgiveness of a prior grade (i.e. grades averaged only).

Although there is no time limit for repeating a course, no student's permanent record may be altered after a degree has been granted based on attempts to successfully repeat a course in which a grade of D, F, or WU was obtained.

Undergraduate students may repeat up to 28 units they attempted first at CSULB in order to achieve a C, B, A, or CR in the course. These students may repeat up to 16 of the 28 units for forgiveness of a prior grade in the calculations of grade point averages, subject to the provisions above. Only courses attempted at CSULB count toward the unit limits. The unit value of a course counts only once toward the unit limits regardless of the number of times the student repeats the course at CSULB. Once a student reaches the 16 unit limit, the student may not repeat any additional courses at CSULB for grade forgiveness. Students may repeat up to an additional 12 units at CSULB for grades averaged (i.e., not for grade forgiveness), after which they may not repeat any additional courses at CSULB for grade forgiveness or grades averaged. No courses repeated prior to the fall semester 2009 count toward the 28 unit limit. No courses for which a W was awarded count toward the 28 unit limit. Undergraduate students may appeal these limits for such reasons as immediately impending graduation.

Grade forgiveness shall not be applicable to courses for which the original grade was the result of a finding of academic dishonesty.

Courses Taken First at Another Institution

If eligible students wish to exclude from grade point determination a grade of D, F, or WU in a course taken at another institution, they may request to do so by enrolling in an equivalent course at CSULB and filing a Petition for Exception to Academic Policy with Enrollment Services. The department in which the course is taught must indicate on the petition which particular course may be taken to replace the previous grade in the calculation of grade point averages. An official transcript from the institution where the original course was taken must be on file at CSULB. Only one repeat is allowed for the purpose of grade forgiveness, and only the repeated grade and grade points will be used in the determination of grade point averages, provided the second grade was A,B,C or CR. If the repeat attempt at CSULB results in a grade of A,B,C or CR the units will not count toward the 28 unit limit. If the repeat attempt at CSULB results in a grade of D, F, NC, or WU, the student may repeat the course one additional time but only for grades averaged, and the units of the first attempt at CSULB will now count toward the 12 unit limit.

A grade received in a course taken at another institution may not be used to replace a grade in an equivalent course taken at CSULB in the calculation of grade point averages but may be used to replace it for other purposes, subject to approval by the appropriate authority at CSULB, such as an advisor in the major.

Repetition of Courses for Credit

A student may repeat for additional units or credit toward a baccalaureate or graduate degree any course specified as repeatable for credit in the CSULB catalog up to the limits specified. Each department determines the unit limits and any other limitations for its courses that may be repeated for credit. Except for courses specified as repeatable for credit and upper-division courses in an undergraduate student's major completed more than ten years prior to graduation, an undergraduate student may not enroll in or receive unit credit for a course for which the student has already received a C, B, A, or CR, including a university-level course taken at a high school or another college or university. Courses repeated for the purpose of validating major requirements will not count either as additional unit credit or toward the calculation of grade point averages. If a student completes a course with a grade of C, B, A, or CR and wishes to register for the course again only to refresh knowledge, then the student should complete and submit the Exception to Academic Policy for Undergraduate Limit form. If approved, the student must enroll with an audit (AU). (PS 09-05)

Grade Appeals

1. Grade Appeal General Information

1.1. The primary authority of the instructor in the assignment of grades must be respected. An instructor's evaluation of a student's work and performance in that instructor's course must not be over-ridden merely because of a difference of opinion or evaluative judgment, provided it is formed in accordance with the generally accepted canons of the relevant discipline and of the academic institution where said course is offered. The university presumes that every instructor wants and tries to be non-prejudicial, objective, and consistent in the assignment of grades. This presumption, however, may be over-ridden by weight of evidence to the contrary.

1.2. Although the university presumes that grades assigned are correct, the university has established this grade appeal procedure both to protect students against academic and administrative evaluations and decisions that are prejudicial, capricious, or arbitrary, and to preserve the authority of instructors to evaluate student work in a nonprejudicial, objective, and consistent way. This procedure, available equally to undergraduate and graduate students, also preserves the rights of instructors to appeal grade appeals committee findings as outlined below. The policy in its entirety constitutes the only grade appeal procedure at California State University, Long Beach.

1.3. The burden of proof rests upon the student submitting the appeal.

1.4. Students may appeal only final grades. Students who believe that individual exams and/or assignments demonstrate evidence of prejudicial, capricious, or arbitrary grading and that those grades had direct bearing on the final grade should include them in the grade appeal file as supporting documentation.

1.5. If a grade appeals committee decides to change a grade, the committee need not grant the student's suggested grade but should assign a grade that is appropriate to the work submitted. The new grade shall not be lower than the original grade.

1.6. Once a student has filed a formal grade appeal, nobody may change a grade until neither the student nor the instructor continues the process or the third and final level has been concluded.

Time lines for filing an appeal and subsequent decisions specified in this policy statement refer to instructional days during the regular fall and spring semesters. In the case of courses that do not follow the traditional semester pattern (such as short-term courses given during a regular semester or programs that require year-round enrollment), students must initiate an appeal within 40 regular semester instructional days of the termination of the course.

1.7. All grade appeal information, whether written or oral, is confidential.

1.8. The student may seek the assistance of an advisor in the preparation of the appeal file. If department and/or college committees permit oral arguments, the advisor may accompany the student to the departmental and/or college hearing and be privy to all confidential information relevant to the case.

1.9. The original file, with all documentation, recommendations, final decisions, and all other materials (including a copy of the grade change, if relevant) shall be kept by the college involved for five years. One complete duplicate set of all documentation shall be kept in the office of the Academic Senate for five years. All other parties must destroy all duplicate materials within thirty instructional days of the final decision.

1.10. Each college dean and the chair of the University Grade Appeals Committee shall provide a written report at the end of each academic year to the president and the Academic Senate on the number of cases heard and the disposition of each case. College deans also shall forward their reports to the chair of the University Grade Appeals Committee.

1.11. If the student's appeal is compounded (or accompanied) by an allegation of unlawful discrimination as defined by federal and state laws, the student has the right to access the university's internal unlawful discrimination process and the processes available through the U.S. Department of Education Office of Civil Rights and the state of California Fair Employment and Housing Commission. However, grades may be changed only through the grade appeal process.

2. Grade Appeals Committees

2.1. Each department and extra-departmental program (hereafter referred to as program) shall form a department/program grade appeals committee. If department/program faculty members are unable to serve in sufficient number to form a grade appeals committee, the chair of the council of the relevant college shall appoint the required number of grade appeals committee members from the ranks of college faculty. A department/program grade appeals committee shall include at least one student member appointed by the Associated Students, Incorporated.

2.2. Each college and the university shall have a standing grade appeals committee, each of which shall include at least one student member appointed by the Associated Students, Incorporated.

2.3. For courses located in a college but not in a department (college-based courses), a first-level grade appeals committee must be formed. The council of the relevant college shall appoint the first-level grade appeals committee from among the faculty members of that college. If review beyond the first-level grade appeals committee is necessary, the appeal next shall go to the regular college-level grade appeals committee.

2.4. For courses not located in a college or department/ program (university-based courses), the Curriculum and Educational Policies Council must create a first- and second-level grade appeals committee by appointing each committee from among its members.

2.5. For courses cross-listed between or among different units, the unit with the prefix under which the student took the course shall handle the grade appeal.

2.6. Committee members, at any level, shall not participate in any way in an appeal of a grade decision in which they have been involved personally. Such participation includes, but is not limited to, assignment of the grade in question, involvement in the class in question, or grading any student work for the class in question.

2.7. No committee member may serve on a committee at more than one level of a single appeal.

2.8. The committee chair at the department/program level and at the college level shall inform all parties of the composition of the grade appeals committee and of the right to peremptory challenge. The student and the instructor involved in any given appeal shall each have one (1) peremptory challenge to remove one (1) committee member from service for that particular appeal. Departments/programs and colleges must replace any removed members within a timely fashion. If peremptory strikes of members are exercised by either party, the committee shall have an additional ten (10) instructional days to review the file and render its decision.

2.9. A grade appeals committee deliberating an appeal during any level of the process shall consider all information submitted and may, if necessary, obtain clarification in writing from the student, the instructor, and/or committees at other levels of the process. The committee may request information to help it understand the basis for assignment of the grade. If either party does not supply appropriate grade appeal information within a reasonable time (see 2.11.) when requested by a committee, then that committee may base its decision on the corresponding information supplied by the other party.

2.10. Committees shall consider only information available to all parties. All parties to an appeal shall be notified by the committee chair in writing of all responses and deadlines at all points of the appeal process and shall have full opportunity to comment in writing.

2.11. Distribution of materials submitted in an appeal shall allow reasonable time for response by the involved parties before committees render their decision. "Reasonable time" for responses shall generally be understood to be ten (10) instructional days from receipt of a response.

2.12. After making its determination, the committee hearing the appeal shall prepare a written statement of its decision, including an explanation of its reasoning and a response to the specific issues upon which the appeal is based. The chair of the committee shall place a copy of the decision statement in the appeal file and shall send copies of the statement to all parties involved.

2.13. Chairs of department/program and college grade appeal committees shall provide a written report to their dean at the end of each semester detailing the number and disposition of cases heard.

3. Preliminary Informal Phase of the Grade Appeals Process: Initiation of Grade Appeals

3.1. Students who believe they have received a final course grade that reflects prejudicial, capricious, or arbitrary grading of their academic performance must make this belief known to the instructor(s), either orally or in writing, before they begin the formal appeal process. In accordance with the Policy on Final Course Grades, Grading Procedures, and Final Assessments, students have a right to be informed of their scores and to review each of their demonstrations of competence with their instructors. If materials submitted for a demonstration of competence are not returned to the student, such materials will be retained for at least two (2) subsequent semesters by the instructor. The materials shall be accessible to the department office. In the absence of the original instructor, an instructor with appropriate qualifications may be appointed by the Chair to review the demonstration of competence with the student.

3.2. In the event an instructor is not available to participate, the department/program chair in the discipline/program may appoint another instructor whose areas of expertise most closely approximates that of the instructor of record to represent the interests of the latter.

3.3. If the student cannot resolve the problem after informal consultation with the instructor and intends to continue the process, the next step is for the student to prepare a grade appeal file.

3.3.1. The file must include:

1. a written statement describing the reasons for the appeal and the recommendation for a new grade;

2. a Grade Appeal Form obtained from the appropriate college office and fully completed; and

3. supporting documents, such as the class syllabus, exams, papers, assignments or other corroborating documents, that show evidence of the alleged improper grading.

3.3.2. The written statement describing the reasons for the appeal shall be addressed to the department/ program chair of the discipline in which the course resides. For the purposes of this policy, a program director or coordinator is considered a program chair.

3.3.3. The grade appeal file must be delivered to the department/program chair within the first 40 instructional days of the regular semester immediately following the semester or special session in which the course was completed.

3.4. After receiving the student's grade appeal file (see 3.3.1., above), the department/program chair will consult with both the student and the instructor(s) involved to attempt a resolution to the grade appeal.

3.4.1. If the instructor of record refuses to participate, the department chair shall insert a written statement to that effect in the appeal file.

3.4.2. If a student is appealing a grade assigned by the department chair, the college dean or designee shall perform all functions of the chair in the appeals process.

3.4.3. In the case of courses that do not follow the traditional semester pattern (such as short-term courses given during a regular semester or programs that require year-round enrollment), students must initiate an appeal within 40 regular semester instructional days of the termination of the course.

4. First Level of the Formal Appeals Process: Appeal to the department/program grade appeals committee.

4.1. Should consultation fail to resolve the appeal and should the student choose to continue the process, the student must ask the chair to forward the appeal to the department/ program grade appeals committee. The student must make this request in writing by the last day of instruction of the regular semester immediately following the semester or special session in which the course was completed.

4.1.1. The department/program chair shall forward the appeal to the department/program grade appeals committee within ten (10) instructional days and may include a written recommendation based upon the first, consultative step in the process (outlined in 3.4., above). The chair must also inform the instructor immediately that the formal grade appeals process has been initiated and must give copies of all materials forwarded to the grade appeals committee to the instructor and to the student.

4.1.2. The instructor may submit a written response to the student's appeal and a rationale to be considered by the grade appeals committee. The department/ program chair must also provide a copy of the response and rationale to the student.

4.1.3. The student may terminate the appeal at any point by submitting a written request to withdraw the appeal.

4.2. The department/program grade appeals committee shall consider the appeal, adhering to the principles and guidelines of paragraphs 1.1., 1.10., 2.9., 2.10., and 2.11., above. A department/program grade appeals committee shall reach its decision within 40 instructional days after it receives the appeal.

4.3. If the appeal is granted by the committee, the committee will then determine a grade for the student based upon the evidence included in the appeal file (e.g., exams, papers, and assignments). The committee shall communicate its decision and rationale as specified in paragraph 2.12., above and shall also provide a copy to the department/program chair.

4.3.1. If both the student and instructor accept the committee's decision, the instructor will then have ten (10) instructional days to initiate the grade change by signing the grade change form and forwarding it to the department/program chair, at which point the grade appeal process is over.

4.3.2. If the student accepts the decision of the committee but, within ten (10) instructional days of the receipt of the committee's decision, the instructor does not either file a grade change or file an appeal of the committee's finding, the grade appeal committee chair shall sign the grade change form in the place of the instructor and forward it to the department/program chair. If the department/ program chair does not sign the form within ten (10) instructional days of notification, the chair of the department/program grade appeal committee will sign in lieu of the department/program chair and then the college dean will authorize the grade change.

4.3.3. If, within ten (10) instructional days, either the instructor or the student files in writing an appeal of the department/program committee's finding, the committee chair shall, within ten (10) instructional days, forward the file (including the committee's decision and rationale) to the college grade appeals committee.

4.4. If the department/program grade appeals committee rejects the appeal, it shall communicate its decision and its rationale as provided in paragraph 2.12., above, and provide a copy also to the department/program chair.

4.4.1. If, within ten (10) instructional days, the student does not request further review of the appeal, the grade appeal process is terminated.

4.4.2. If, within ten (10) instructional days, the student communicates in writing her/his wish to continue the appeal process, the committee chair shall, within ten (10) instructional days, forward the file (including the committee's decision and rationale) to the college grade appeals committee.

5. Second Level of the Formal Appeals Process: Appeal to the College Grade Appeals Committee

5.1. An appeal of a department/program grade appeals committee decision, by either the instructor or the student, begins with a written letter of appeal to have that decision reviewed. This letter of appeal should be directed to the appropriate college grade appeal committee (also called college committee in this document) by way of the department/program chair. The department/program chair must then inform within five (5) instructional days the instructor, student, and college dean in writing that an appeal has been filed and the dean must inform within five (5) instructional days the appropriate college grade appeals committee in writing that an appeal has been lodged. The chair of the department/program grade appeals committee must forward within five (5) instructional days the appeal file, including the committee's decision and rationale, to the college dean who must immediately inform the college grade appeals committee that the grade appeal file has been received and is ready for review.

5.2. The committee chair at the college level shall inform all parties of the composition of the grade appeals committee and of the right to peremptory challenge. The college grade appeals committee shall normally render its review decision within twenty (20) instructional days of receipt of the grade appeal file. However, if peremptory strikes of members are exercised by either party, the committee shall have an additional ten (10) instructional days to review the file and render its decision.

5.3. The college grade appeals committee shall review the grade appeal file, the department/program grade appeals committee's decision and rationale, and any rebuttal to that decision and rationale provided by the student or instructor in the light of paragraphs 1.1. through 4.4., above. During its review it may consider and act upon matters of both procedure and substance.

5.4. As a result of its review, the college grade appeals committee may confirm the decision of the department committee or it may recommend re-consideration.

5.4.1. If the college grade appeals committee confirms the decision of the department/program grade appeals committee, and if neither the instructor nor the student requests further review, then the grade appeal process ends. The chair of the college committee must inform in writing all parties, including the department/program chair and the department/ program grade appeals committee. If a grade change has been recommended by the department/ program committee but held in abeyance pending the appeal, the department/program chair shall, within ten (10) instructional days, authorize the grade change by filing the appropriate form. In the event that the department/program chair does not effect the change within ten (10) instructional days of notification, the chair of the college grade appeal committee will sign in lieu of the instructor or the department/program chair. The college dean will then authorize the grade change.

5.4.2. If either the student or the instructor communicates in writing her/his intention to continue the appeal process, the college committee chair shall, within ten (10) instructional days, forward the file (including the college committee's decision and rationale) to the University Grade Appeals Committee.

5.4.3. If the college grade appeals committee recommends re-consideration, it shall put in writing its rationale (which may involve matters of procedure or substance) and any recommendations it may have (which may include recommendations of substance or procedure, new constitution of the department/program committee, or other recommendations toward realizing a fair evaluation of the matters at issue). The chair of the college grade appeal committee shall return the grade appeal file, including the rationale and recommendations of the college committee, to the department/program grade appeals committee for re-consideration and supply copies of the recommendations to all other parties, including the department/program chair.

5.5. When a grade appeal decision has been returned for re-consideration, the department/program grade appeals committee shall review the rationale and recommendations of the college grade appeals committee. It shall undertake to remedy procedural faults identified by the college committee. It shall consider anew the substance of the grade appeal, with due attention to whatever recommendations have been advanced by the college committee. The department/ program grade appeals committee shall render a new decision on the appeal, which may be a reiteration of its original decision or may be a different decision (which may, but need not be, in agreement with the college committee's recommendations).

5.5.1. The department/program grade appeals committee shall render its reconsideration within twenty (20) instructional days of receipt of the grade appeal file. If peremptory strikes of members are exercised by either party, the committee shall have an additional ten (10) instructional days to review the file and render its decision.

5.5.2. Upon reaching its decision, the department/ program grade appeals committee shall report, in writing, its response to all procedural faults identified by the college committee and shall again put in writing its rationale for its decision on the substance of the grade appeal. The chair of the department/program grade appeals committee shall forward these reports with the grade appeals file to the college grade appeals committee and supply copies to all other parties, including the department/ program chair.

5.6. The college grade appeals committee shall review the re-considered decision of the department/program committee. It may seek clarification from the department/ program committee. It shall either confirm or disagree with the decision of the department/program committee. The chair of the college grade appeals committee must inform all parties in writing of its decision.

5.6.1. If within ten (10) instructional days following notification of the college committee's decision, the student or instructor communicates in writing her/his wish to continue the appeal process, the committee chair shall forward the file (including the committee's decision and rationale) to the University Grade Appeals Committee.

5.6.2. If a grade change is recommended by the committee and the change is not appealed by either the instructor or the student (in compliance with 4.5.1., above), the college grade appeals committee chair shall, within ten (10) instructional days of the college committee's action, inform the college dean, in writing, of its decision and the college dean will authorize the grade change as determined by the committee.

6. Third Level of the Appeals Process: Appeal to the University Grade Appeals Committee

6.1. The University Grade Appeals Committee shall function as the third and final level of the grade appeals process. The University Grade Appeals Committee may communicate with the student, the instructor, and the department/program and college grade appeals committees as needed.

6.2. The University Grade Appeals Committee shall normally render its decision within twenty (20) instructional days of receipt of the grade appeal file.

6.3. The University Grade Appeals Committee shall review the grade appeals file, the lower level committees' decisions and rationales, and any rebuttals to those decisions and rationales provided by the student or instructor. It may consider both matters of procedure and substance. The committee may seek further clarification from either lower level committee or the student or instructor as needed. The University Grade Appeals Committee shall either confirm or disagree with the decision of the college grade appeals committee.

6.3.1. If the University Grade Appeals Committee determines that the grade appeal guidelines have not been followed, it may send the appeal back to the department/program or college grade appeals committee for reconsideration.

6.3.2. In the event that a grade change is authorized by the University Grade Appeals Committee, the chair of the University Grade Appeals Committee shall ensure that the appropriate change-of-grade form is properly signed by the provost and filed with Enrollment Services.

6.3.3. The chair of the University Grade Appeals Committee shall inform all parties to the grade appeal, in writing, of the committee's decision.

6.3.4. The rendering of the University Grade Appeals Committee's decision, notification of all parties of the decision, and effecting of a grade change where authorized by the committee, completes the appeal process.

Probation and Disqualification

Academic Probation

Undergraduate students are placed on academic probation if at any time their cumulative grade-point average in all college work attempted or their cumulative GPA at California State University, Long Beach falls below 2.0 (C). Graduate students are placed on academic probation when their cumulative grade-point average or grade-point average on all courses applicable to the degree falls below 3.0. Other post-baccalaureate students are placed on academic probation when their cumulative grade-point average falls below 2.5.

Undergraduate students will be removed from academic probation when their cumulative grade-point average in all college work attempted and their cumulative grade-point average at California State University, Long Beach is 2.0 (C) or higher. Graduate students will be removed from academic probation when their overall grade-point average and grade-point average on all courses applicable to the degree are 3.0 (B) or higher.

Other post-baccalaureate students will be removed from academic probation when their overall grade-point average is 2.5 or higher.

Administrative Academic Probation

An undergraduate or graduate student may be placed on administrative-academic probation by action of appropriate campus officials for any of the following reasons:

  1. Withdrawal from all or a substantial portion of a program of studies in two successive semesters or in any three semesters, unless the withdrawals were directly associated with a chronic or recurring medical condition or its treatment;
  2. Repeated failure to progress toward the stated degree objective or other program objective (when such failure appears to be due to circumstances within the control of the student);
  3. Failure to comply, after due notice, with an academic requirement or regulation which is routine for all students or a defined group of students (e.g., failure to take placement tests, failure to complete a required practicum).

Academic Disqualification

Students who remain on academic probation for more than two consecutive semesters are subject to academic disqualification.

Undergraduate students on academic probation are subject to academic disqualification when:

  1. As freshmen (fewer than 30 semester-hours of college work completed), their grade-point average falls below 1.5 on all units attempted or on all units attempted at California State University, Long Beach;
  2. As sophomores (fewer than 59 semester-hours of college work completed), their grade-point average falls below 1.7 on all units attempted or on all units attempted at California State University, Long Beach;
  3. As juniors (60 to 89 semester-hours of college work completed), their grade-point average falls below 1.85 on all units attempted or on all units attempted at California State University, Long Beach;
  4. As seniors (90 or more semester-hours of college work completed), their grade-point average falls below 1.95 on all units attempted or on all units attempted at California State University, Long Beach;
    and

In addition to the above disqualification standards applicable to students on probation, individuals not on probation may be disqualified when both of the following circumstances exist:

  1. At the end of any semester, if the student has a cumulative grade-point average below 1.0; and
  2. The cumulative grade-point average is so low that in view of the student's overall educational record it seems unlikely that the deficiency will be removed within a reasonable period.

Graduate and post-baccalaureate students are subject to disqualification if while on probation they fail to earn grades of sufficient quality to remove themselves from probationary status. Disqualification will bar such students from any further enrollment at CSULB.

Disqualification From Impacted Programs

Students who fail to maintain an overall GPA of 2.0 will be immediately removed from an impacted major and placed in the undeclared category or in a general category appropriate to the discipline. To be reinstated as majors in the impacted program, they must reapply at the time when change-of-major requests are normally accepted.

Administrative Academic Disqualification

A student who have been placed on administrative-academic probation may be disqualified from further attendance if:

  1. The conditions for removal of administrative-academic probation are not met within the period specified;
  2. The student becomes subject to academic probation while on administrative-academic probation;
  3. The student becomes subject to administrative-academic probation for the same or similar reason for which they have been placed on administrative-academic probation previously, although not currently in such status.

In addition, an appropriate campus administrator may disqualify a student who at any time during enrollment has demonstrated behavior so contrary to the standards of the profession for which the student is preparing as to render her/him unfit for the profession. In such cases, disqualification will occur immediately upon notice to the student, which shall include an explanation of the basis for the action, and the campus may require the student to discontinue enrollment as of the date of the notification.

For students who subsequently become eligible for reinstatement (see below), disqualification under the provisions of the preceding paragraphs constitutes a break in "continuous enrollment" within a degree major program; therefore, students disqualified may not elect any regulations in effect prior to disqualification.

Reinstatement

In order to be considered for reinstatement to CSULB, a disqualified student must demonstrate progress toward the degree. This demonstration can be achieved by:

  1. Completing courses through College of Continuing and Professional Education at CSULB; or
  2. Completing classes at other regionally accredited academic institutions.

All classes considered for reinstatement in the student's petition must be applicable for degree credit and toward the student's General Education or major requirements. Please note each major has Major Specific Declaration Requirements which must be met in order to be considered. Progress toward meeting the GPA requirement can be demonstrated by reducing the deficiency in grade-point average by one-half at CSULB or by making equivalent grades in courses taken at other regionally accredited academic institutions. Grades earned at other regionally accredited academic institutions will not reduce the deficiency in the CSULB grade-point deficiency. Grades earned elsewhere are only indicators of academic ability.

After reducing the deficiency in the CSULB grade-point average by one-half, demonstrating academic ability at other regionally accredited academic institutions and meeting Major Specific Degree Requirements, the student may petition the Academic Appeals Committee for reinstatement. The petition must present evidence that the student is likely to achieve a satisfactory grade-point average and to complete requirements for the degree in accordance with the Timely Graduation Policy. The Academic Appeals Committee will only consider the petition for reinstatement of students who have remained outside of the university for at least one regular (fall or spring) semester after their dismissal.

Petition forms are available through Enrollment Services and must be filed along with an application and any other required documents by the deadline published on the Enrollment Services website. Petitions received after that date will be returned to the student to be submitted for consideration for a future semester. (PS 09-06)

Disqualified undergraduate students taking courses through College of Continuing and Professional Education will be eligible to enroll in a limited amount of courses. Fall and Spring Semesters: 6 units or two courses, as long as enrollment in these two courses does not exceed 7 units. Summer Session: 6 units or two courses, as long as enrollment in these two courses does not exceed 7 units. Winter Session: 4 units.

The University Center for Undergraduate Advising offers Reinstatement Workshops for Undergraduate Students who have been academically disqualified. The workshops help students to learn how to become reinstated to the university. For more information or to sign up for the workshop call (562) 985-7847 or visit the University Center for Undergraduate Advising, located in the Horn Center Room 103.

Academic Appeal of Disqualification

Undergraduate students who have made academic progress and believe that there were extenuating circumstances that led to their academic disqualification may file an appeal asking to extend their academic probation for an additional semester. Students must submit their appeals immediately following notification by Enrollment Services that they have been disqualified. The Appeal of Disqualification information and form are available through the University Center for Undergraduate Advising.

Academic Renewal

An undergraduate student may petition to have all the grades and units received during one or two semesters (or up to three quarter terms) of undergraduate work disregarded in the computation of grade point averages and academic standing. The work so disregarded may have been taken at any collegiate-level institution but no work taken during the disregarded terms, even if satisfactory, may apply toward baccalaureate requirements. All grades and units attempted will remain on record. At least five calendar years must have elapsed since the work in question was completed and the student must have subsequently completed 15 semester units with a 3.0 GPA (or 30 semester units with a 2.5 or 45 semester units with a 2.0) at CSULB before filing a request for disregarding the coursework. At the time of filing the petition the student must have either already met all requirements for graduation other than one or more grade point averages or all other remaining requirements are in progress during the semester of filing. No student may use academic renewal to raise any grade point average above what is required for graduation.

Students shall submit petitions for academic renewal to Enrollment Services. Final determination shall be made by the provost (or designee) in consultation with the Academic Appeals Committee. The petitioning student must certify that the work to be disregarded was substandard and not reflective of her or his current scholastic ability or present level of academic performance. This certification must include a statement explaining the extenuating circumstances causing the substandard performance during the terms in question. The student must also provide evidence that it would be necessary to complete additional units or semesters in order to qualify for the baccalaureate degree if the request were not approved. (PS 09-08)

Academic Appeals

Students may petition for exception to academic policy. Typically, exception requests involve issues such as record errors, General Education substitutions or waivers, reinstatement, exceptions to the repeat/delete policy, and academic renewal.

Students can obtain the "Petition for Exception to Academic Policy" forms from the Office of Enrollment Services, Brotman Hall Room 101, or the University Center for Undergraduate Advising (UCUA), located in Horn Center, Room 103. This written appeal will be directed to the Academic Appeals Committee. Petitions must be filed with the Office of Enrollment Services, BH-101.

Cancellation of Registration or Withdrawal From CSULB

Students who find it necessary to cancel their registration or to withdraw from all classes after enrolling for any academic term are required to follow the university's official withdrawal procedures. Failure to follow formal university procedures may result in an obligation to pay fees as well as the assignment of failing grades in all courses and the need to apply for readmission before being permitted to enroll in another academic term. Information on canceling registration and withdrawal procedures is available online at the Enrollment Services website.

Students who receive financial aid funds must consult with the Financial Aid Office prior to withdrawing from the university regarding any required return or repayment of grant or loan assistance received for that academic term or payment period. Students who have received financial aid and withdraw from the institution during the academic term or payment period may need to return or repay some or all of the funds received, which may result in a debt owed to the institution.

Refund of Student Fees

Regulations governing the refund of student fees in the California State University system are prescribed by the CSU Board of Trustees; see California Code of Regulations, Title 5, Education, Section 41802.

Educational Leave

Any registered student, undergraduate or graduate, in good academic standing may request an Educational Leave. Students requesting an Educational Leave must complete an Educational Leave Form, in advance, including an explanation of their reasons for seeking the leave and a statement of when they intend to resume academic work. The completed form should be submitted to the Office of Enrollment Services, Brotman Hall 101.

The minimum initial leave will be one full semester; the maximum will be one calendar year. A student may submit, in advance, a new educational leave request form for an extension of leave. Under no circumstances will the total number of approved educational leaves exceed two, nor will the duration of approved educational leaves extend beyond two calendar years.

Students returning from an approved educational leave are not required to submit an application for readmission to the university. Students returning from an absence for which an educational leave was appropriate but not approved in advance must reapply for admission and pay the reapplication fee.

Graduate students who plan to enroll for credit at another institution of higher education during the leave period must obtain prior approval for the transfer of course credit to the student's program from the department graduate advisor, department chair, and the College Dean or designee.

The period of an educational leave is counted in the calculation of elapsed time under the regulations governing the maximum period for completion of degree and remediation requirements. (See Baccalaureate and Graduate sections of this catalog).

For the period of an educational leave the student's rights under the "Election of Regulations" rule are preserved, maintaining the right of the student to elect regulations as if he or she had maintained continuous attendance.

An educational leave presupposes no expenditure of University resources or faculty and staff time on behalf of the student during the period of the leave. In addition, no computer facilities, no library privileges, and no student services are available to a student on educational leave.

Credit Hour

As of July 1, 2011 federal law (Title 34, Code of Federal Regulations, sections 600.2 and 600.4) requires all accredited institutions to comply with the federal definition of the credit hour. For all CSU degree programs and courses bearing academic credit, the "credit hour" is defined as "the amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than:

  1. One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work each week for approximately 15 weeks for one semester or trimester hour of credit, or 10 to 12 weeks for one quarter hour of credit, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time; or
  2. At least an equivalent amount of work as required in paragraph (1) of this definition for other academic activities as established by the institution, including laboratory work, internships, practica, studio work, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours."

A credit hour is assumed to be a 50-minute period. In courses in which "seat time" does not apply, a credit hour may be measured by an equivalent amount of work, as demonstrated by student achievement.